A single case outbreak of Nipah Encephalitis from India in May –June 2019

We report a case of Nipah Virus Encephalitis, which had a sub-acute presentation, had prolonged viral shedding with symptoms but no documented secondary cases in spite of many having prolonged and close contact with the patient.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: 0589 Source Type: research

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Conclusions. The two peptides TVYHCSAVY and FLIDRINWI have showed a very strong binding affinity to MHC class I and MHC class II alleles. Furthermore, considering the conservancy, the affinity, and the population coverage, the peptide FLIDRINWIT is highly suitable to be utilized to formulate a new vaccine against glycoprotein G of Nipah henipavirus. An in vivo study for the proposed peptides is also highly recommended. PMID: 32377531 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Journal of Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: J Immunol Res Source Type: research
ettil Viral outbreaks of varying frequencies and severities have caused panic and havoc across the globe throughout history. Influenza, small pox, measles, and yellow fever reverberated for centuries, causing huge burden for economies. The twenty-first century witnessed the most pathogenic and contagious virus outbreaks of zoonotic origin including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and Nipah virus. Nipah is considered one of the world’s deadliest viruses with the heaviest mortality rates in some instances. It is known...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
This week I attended the Nipah Virus International Conference in Singapore, marking the discovery of the virus 20 years ago. It’s an opportune time to recall the events around the emergence of this deadly pathogen. An outbreak of respiratory disease and encephalitis in pigs during 1998 took place in Ipoh City of Perak state in […]
Source: virology blog - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Basic virology Information encephalitis fruit bat Hendra virus henipavirus Nipah virus pandemic Pteropus respiratory disease spillover viral viruses Source Type: blogs
Nipah virus is an emerging pathogenic paramyxovirus responsible for sporadic and isolated outbreaks of severe respiratory and neurologic disease in Southern Asia. As a zoonotic virus, disease can manifest in both animals and human with indigenous fruit bats acting as natural reservoirs of the virus. The effects of viral infection vary from acute respiratory distress to fatal encephalitis. There are currently no approved therapeutics or vaccines against the virus, and growing concerns that this highly pathogenic infection has the potential to cause larger epidemics capable of inflicting significant mortality burden.Like the...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Ochani RK, Batra S, Shaikh A, Asad A Abstract The Nipah virus was discovered twenty years ago, and there is considerable information available regarding the specificities surrounding this virus such as transmission, pathogenesis and genome. Belonging to the Henipavirus genus, this virus can cause fever, encephalitis and respiratory disorders. The first cases were reported in Malaysia and Singapore in 1998, when affected individuals presented with severe febrile encephalitis. Since then, much has been identified about this virus. These single-stranded RNA viruses gain entry into target cells via a process k...
Source: Infezioni in Medicina - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infez Med Source Type: research
Authors: Singh RK, Dhama K, Chakraborty S, Tiwari R, Natesan S, Khandia R, Munjal A, Vora KS, Latheef SK, Karthik K, Singh Malik Y, Singh R, Chaicumpa W, Mourya DT Abstract Nipah (Nee-pa) viral disease is a zoonotic infection caused by Nipah virus (NiV), a paramyxovirus belonging to the genus Henipavirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. It is a biosafety level-4 pathogen, which is transmitted by specific types of fruit bats, mainly Pteropus spp. which are natural reservoir host. The disease was reported for the first time from the Kampung Sungai Nipah village of Malaysia in 1998. Human-to-human transmission also occu...
Source: Veterinary Quarterly - Category: Veterinary Research Tags: Vet Q Source Type: research
ConclusionsOur findings suggest hospital-based surveillance missed nearly half of all Nipah outbreaks. This analytical method allowed us to estimate the underlying burden of disease, which is important for emerging diseases where healthcare access may be limited.
Source: International Journal of Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: Microbes and InfectionAuthor(s): Nazia Thakur, Dalan BaileyAbstractNipah virus is an emerging zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes severe and often fatal respiratory and neurological disease in humans. The virus was first discovered after an outbreak of encephalitis in pig farmers in Malaysia and Singapore with subsequent outbreaks in Bangladesh or India occurring almost annually. Due to the highly pathogenic nature of NiV, its pandemic potential, and the lack of licensed vaccines or therapeutics, there is a requirement for research and development into highly sensit...
Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Purpose: Nipah virus (NiV), a paramyxovirus, causes febrile encephalitis and severe respiratory disease in humans and animals. Nipah virus outbreaks have been reported from Malaysia, Bangladesh, India and Singapore. The case positive in humans have been attributed to zoonotic transmission from pigs and bats, human-to-human transmission, and eating fruits or juices contaminated with bat secretions. At present no vaccines or drugs are available for those infected with NiV. Fruit bats of family Pteropodidae have been identified as the reservoir for NiV.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: 20.066 Source Type: research
Nipah virus, within the paramyxoviridae family (Wang et al., 2001), was first identified in humans with encephalitis in the 1998-1999 outbreak in Malaysia and Singapore involving at least 276 cases and 106 deaths (Chua et al., 2000). The epidemiologic link was from fruit bats infecting pigs that then served as an amplifier host and infected humans through close contact. Person-to-person transmission was rarely documented, and no further human cases have been reported from either country. Detailed analyses of the environmental changes that triggered this outbreak connecting wildlife (bats), livestock (pigs) and humans was r...
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Perspective Source Type: research
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