IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 6766: SARS-CoV-2 Infections and Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: Results from an Observational Study in Primary Care in Belgium

IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 6766: SARS-CoV-2 Infections and Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Pregnancy and Breastfeeding: Results from an Observational Study in Primary Care in Belgium International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph17186766 Authors: Michael Ceulemans Jan Y. Verbakel Kristel Van Calsteren An Eerdekens Karel Allegaert Veerle Foulon COVID-19 also affects pregnant and breastfeeding women. Hence, clinicians and policymakers require reliable evidence on COVID-19 epidemiology and consequences in this population. We aimed to assess the susceptibility of pregnant women to SARS-CoV-2 and women’s perceived impact of the pandemic on their breastfeeding practices, medical counseling and social support. We performed a cross-sectional study using an online survey in primary care in Belgium. Pregnant and breastfeeding women and women who breastfed in the preceding four weeks were eligible to participate. The survey was distributed through social media in April 2020. In total, 6470 women participated (i.e., 2647 pregnant and 3823 breastfeeding women). Overall, 0.3% of all respondents reported to have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, not indicating a higher susceptibility of pregnant women to contracting COVID-19. More than 90% refuted that the pandemic affected their breastfeeding practices, nor indicated that the coronavirus was responsible for breastfeeding cessation. Half of the women even considered giving long...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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After being epidemic in China, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2) infection has rapidly spread in many countries as a global pandemic, with the number of affected cases dramatically increasing worldwide on a daily basis. Although the median age of hospitalized patients with confirmed infection is usually more advanced 1, with older age reported to be associated to higher mortality rate 2, physiological adaptations occurring during pregnancy have been claimed to be potentially responsible for a more severe respiratory disease, thus leading to higher rates of maternal and fetal complications 3,4.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
An enigmatic epidemiological feature of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is the high rate of asymptomatic infection in pregnant women.1 This is puzzling because systemic immune changes predispose pregnant women to increased severity of respiratory viral infections, especially influenza A.2 A major roadblock in understanding this atypical clinical presentation is the poor characterization of cellular entry factors for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) — angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and the androgen-sensitive transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) — in the respiratory tract during pregnancy.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research
Authors: Recker F, Weber E, Strizek B, Gembruch U, Seibel A Abstract In the current coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, certain patients are becoming seriously ill. Lung pathologies are common, and some patients even go on to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which requires intubation and artificial respiration of the critically ill patient. Imaging of the lung is absolutely necessary to obtain a diagnosis, assess the course of disease and for treatment. Particularly in gynecology and obstetrics (OBGYN), ultrasound scans of the lung can be a useful additional tool when caring for pregnant patients in...
Source: Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde - Category: OBGYN Tags: Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by a novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was declared a pandemic in January 2020. Although most of the cases in pregnant women are mild, there are reports of increasing severe infection in pregnancy. Only a few case of SARS-CoV-2 infection in preterm neonates delivered by mothers with COVID-19 have been reported till date.
Source: Pediatrics and Neonatology - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Short Communication Source Type: research
In January of this year, oblivious of the fact that we were about to engage in a twisted round of real-life Jumanji, we released our annual digital health trends e-book. Among one of our 12 forecasts for 2020 was that at-home blood tests would gain traction and become the new direct-to-consumer DNA testing in terms of adoption and availability. While the pandemic threw everyone off guard and messed up regular forecasts, we might have been onto something with our predicted trend. With the need to limit physical contact and trace COVID-positive individuals rapidly, public health authorities worldwide are finding rapid, po...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy fda testing outbreak covid19 at-home tests WHO point-of-care POC antibodies virus nasal swab test PCR Abbot Source Type: blogs
Abstract Although COVID-19 is predominantly a respiratory disease, it is known to affect multiple organ systems. In this article, we highlight the impact of SARS-CoV-2 (the coronavirus causing COVID-19) on the central nervous system as there is an urgent need to understand the longitudinal impacts of COVID-19 on brain function, behaviour and cognition. Furthermore, we address the possibility of intergenerational impacts of COVID-19 on the brain, potentially via both maternal and paternal routes. Evidence from preclinical models of earlier coronaviruses has shown direct viral infiltration across the blood-brain bar...
Source: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn this case series of 67 test ‐positive women with clinical presentation ranging from asymptomatic to manifest COVID‐19 disease few women presented with severe COVID‐19 illness, a majority had a vaginal birth at term with a healthy neonate that were test‐negative for SARS‐CoV‐2.
Source: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
AbstractThe novel coronavirus outbreak induces many concerns about the management of pregnancy, as well as rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. The very rapid spread of the infection throughout all inhabited continents leads to a fast-growing number of infected with SARS-CoV-2 and requires answers and special recommendations to the most vulnerable group of people: pregnant woman and patients on immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive treatment. A systematic literature search was performed in Embase, MEDLINE, and Scopus database for studies describing COVID-19 infection in pregnant women diagnosed with rheumatic and muscul...
Source: Rheumatology International - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
SUMMARY Since the outbreak of a cluster of patients with pneumonia of unknown cause in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, in December 2019, the disease was later officially named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), quickly spreading globally. Pregnant women and children are particularly vulnerable during disasters and emergencies. Comprehensive and applicable emergency preparedness and response are definitely important methods to prevent and contain the COVID-19 pandemic. The rational allocation of pharmaceutical resources plays an important role in...
Source: Revista da Associacao Medica Brasileira - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 32959455 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Ultrasound Review of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: Radiology Authors: Tags: Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol Source Type: research
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