The Evaluation of Cancer Screening

Cancer screening uses many investigative procedures, and different screening programs and methods have different objectives. For example, mammography aims to detect breast cancer at an earlier stage when successful treatment is more likely, whereas colonoscopy is aimed primarily at detecting adenomas in the colon and removing them, thus preventing them from progressing to cancer at all. Evaluation has different objectives, including proof of principle, checking that screening services are delivering the desired clinical outcome, technical quality control of the investigation procedures. All necessitate a range of tools for evaluation. We review these tools, with particular attention to appropriate outcome measures.
Source: Medical Clinics of North America - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research

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Before the pandemic, about 1,000 new patients came to Boston’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for treatment consultations each week. When COVID-19 hit Massachusetts this spring, the number of new consultations fell by half and the hospital moved as many appointments as possible online. Now, with daily case counts relatively low in the area, the hospital is back to scheduling about 800 consultations per week, using a mixture of telemedicine and in-person appointments, says associate chief medical officer Dr. Andrew Wagner—but that still means about 200 cancer patients per week are not getting the treatment consult...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Authors: Pramono LA Abstract The year of 2020 teaches us to prevent is always better than to cure. It is an old phrase that is being used for decades, but it is never been implemented cordially by our society nowadays. Covid-19 is a good lesson that reminds us to carefully prevent the spread of coronavirus which is now a pandemic worldwide. People now wash their hands more often and clean, wear a mask everywhere - everytime, do physical distancing, do healthy lifestyle such as physical activity, healthy diet, and consume multivitamins. They obey the cough and sneeze etiquette. Prevention awareness is never been suc...
Source: Acta medica Indonesiana - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Acta Med Indones Source Type: research
Liz Satterfield has a ritual for every time she returns home after leaving the house. Diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2016, the Kirkland, Washington resident recently learned that the cancer that had spread to her brain in 2018 was still growing. Throughout the pandemic, she’s had to visit the hospital at least once every three weeks, often more frequently, for treatments to control her disease. “I have a pair of shoes in a paper bag that I keep in the trunk of my car or a rack in the garage. I only wear those shoes when I’m going in to get treatment,” she says. “When I come home, I...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Among the many remarkable things that have happened since the COVID-19 pandemic began is that a lot of our usual medical care has simply stopped. According to a recent study, routine testing for cervical cancer, cholesterol, and blood sugar is down nearly 70% across the country. Elective surgeries, routine physical examinations, and other screening tests have been canceled or rescheduled so that people can stay at home, avoid being around others who might be sick, and avoid unknowingly spreading the virus. Many clinics, hospitals, and doctors’ offices have been closed for weeks except for emergencies. Even if these f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Health care Healthy Aging Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Health-Related Complications of Acromegaly—Risk of Malignant Neoplasms Marek Ruchala*† and Kosma Wolinski† Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, PoznaƄ, Poland The issue of increased risk of benign and malignant neoplasms in patients with acromegaly remains the topic of debate from many years and was addressed by numerous studies. Many of them have shown increase in the cancer incidence. Among particular types of malignancies, thyroid, colorectal, and breast cancer are most commonly indicated as associated with acromegaly. Single ...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study analyzed data from women over 40 and compared the size of breast cancers at the time of diagnosis detected in the 1970s (before mammography became common) with the size of tumors detected between 2000 and 2002, when screening mammography was routine. Treatments and rates of death due to breast cancer 10 years after the diagnosis were also analyzed. The study found that: As more women underwent routine screening mammograms, more small breast cancers were detected. Many of these tumors were restricted to the ducts within the breast (called ductal carcinoma in situ), and even without treatment would never threaten...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Let us sing the praises of good medical screening tests. These are the tests that can detect medical problems before they become untreatable and before they cause complications or even death. Even better are those screening tests that detect “predisease” — abnormalities that aren’t dangerous on their own but can lead to problems later. According to the US Preventive Services Task Force, relatively few screening tests are considered good enough to routinely recommend for adults, including mammography for breast cancer (women) Pap smear for cervical cancer (women) b...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Cancer Health Prevention Screening Source Type: blogs
Cancer screening can save lives. Mammographies reduce the chance women will die of breast cancer; and colonoscopies reduce the chance people will die of colon cancer. But should my 93-year-old father receive a screening colonoscopy? The test is uncomfortable, carries risks, and costs money. Even more importantly, my dad probably won’t live long enough to benefit from the test. That’s why most medical experts think people like my dad—people unlikely to live another decade—should not receive cancer screening tests like colonoscopies. But how in the heck is my dad’s doctor supposed to deliver thi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Geriatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs
We do regularly try to detect some cancers early through mammograms, colonoscopies, and PSA tests. I think most of us (meaning the general public) are comfortable with these tests as we age. But what if there was a genetic test available which you could have done regularly, every few years or whatever time frame, to test you for several different cancers before they had a chance to spread.A new test,CancerSEEK, has been tested on more than 1000 patients and seems very hopeful." The CancerSEEK test looks for mutations in 16 genes that regularly arise in cancer and eight proteins that are often released.It was trialled ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer detection cancer diagnosis medical tests Source Type: blogs
Shutterstock Cancer screening can save lives: Mammographies reduce the chance women will die of breast cancer; and colonoscopies reduce the chance people will die of colon cancer. But should my 93-year-old father receive a screening colonoscopy? The test is uncomfortable, … Continue reading → The post How to Tell Grandpa He Is Too Old for Another Colonoscopy appeared first on PeterUbel.com.
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care cancer screening Doctor patient communication Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs
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