Harvard Health Ad Watch: A feel-good message about a diabetes drug

This 60-second advertisement for Trulicity, a medication for diabetes, is one of the most feel-good medication commercials I’ve ever seen. The narrator never uses the scare tactic of so many other ads, listing the terrible things that could happen if you don’t take the treatment. Instead, from start to finish, music, images, and spoken words deliver empowering, encouraging messages focused on helping your body to do what it’s supposed to be doing despite having diabetes. There’s a lot of good information here, but as in most direct-to-consumer health marketing there’s also some that’s missing. Let’s go through it, shall we? Three actors, three positive messages The ad opens with uplifting music and statements by three people with type 2 diabetes (though all are actors, as noted in text at the bottom of the screen). A woman faces the camera to declare “My body is truly powerful.” So far so good! Then a man wearing a hard hat and holding blueprints at a construction site states “I have the power to lower my blood sugar and A1C.” More good news! By the way, he’s referring to hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), a molecule in the circulatory system that serves as a standard test of average blood sugar over the previous two to three months. A normal or nearly normal HbA1C suggests good diabetic control, while higher results indicate elevated blood sugar and poorer control of diabetes. We then meet a third woman wearing scr...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Drugs and Supplements Health Source Type: blogs

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ConclusionsWomen in our study with pre-gestational diabetes were overweight, were older and had long-standing diabetes mellitus. Our patients with type 2 diabetes had a higher BMI, were older, had a shorter duration of diabetes mellitus and had better diabetes control compared to women with type 1 diabetes. Women treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion had a higher rate of miscarriage with more congenital malformations. The initial inadequate diabetes control was significantly improved during pregnancy.
Source: Diabetes Therapy - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
In conclusion, it remains unclear if brain-specific regional and temporal changes occur in the expression of the different APP variants during AD progression. Since APP is also found in blood cells, assessing the changes in APP mRNA expression in peripheral blood cells from AD patients has been considering an alternative. However, again the quantification of APP mRNA in peripheral blood cells has generated controversial results. Brain APP protein has been analyzed in only a few studies, probably as it is difficult to interpret the complex pattern of APP variants and fragments. We previously characterized the soluabl...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusions/interpretationOur data on the efficacy of ART treatment in women with type 1 and type 2 diabetes is the first in this field. When compared with women without diabetes, women with type 1 diabetes had an equivalent chance of a live birth per embryo transfer whereas women with type 2 diabetes had a reduced chance. The findings in women with type 2 diabetes did not seem to be driven by obesity per se as the same pattern was seen in both normal-weight and obese women.Graphical abstract
Source: Diabetologia - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Clinical practice guidelines on diabetes mellitus and pregnancy: Ι. Pre-existing type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hormones (Athens). 2020 May 15;: Authors: Anastasiou E, Farmakidis G, Gerede A, Goulis DG, Koukkou E, Kourtis A, Mamopoulos A, Papadimitriou K, Papadopoulos V, Stefos T Abstract Women with type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM) diagnosed prior to pregnancy are classified as having pre-existing diabetes mellitus (DM). The prevalence of hyperglycemia in pregnancy has been estimated at 17% globally and 5.4% in Europe, differences existing among racial and ethnic groups, following the...
Source: Hormones - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Hormones (Athens) Source Type: research
ConclusionChild's high and increasing BMI trajectory was strongly associated with maternal prepregnancy obesity and overweight, modestly associated with maternal T1D, T2D, and GDM requiring medication treatment and EGWG, and slightly associated with breastfeeding  ≤ 6 months. GDM not requiring medication treatment during pregnancy had little association.
Source: Pediatric Obesity - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
Conclusions/interpretationMaternal obesity is associated with increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in the offspring. Evidence-based strategies that reduce obesity among women of reproductive age and that might reduce the incidence of diabetes in their offspring are urgently required.
Source: Diabetologia - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
To secure adequate carbohydrate supply in pregnancy, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommends a minimum amount of carbohydrates of 175 g daily. Currently a low carbohydrate diet is a popular health trend in the general population and this might also be common among overweight and obese pregnant women with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, we explored carbohydrate consumption among pregnant women with T2D including women with type 1 diabetes (T1D) for comparison.
Source: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
Type 1 diabetes in pregnancy is associated with increased risk of maternal and offspring complications such as congenital malformations, preeclampsia, preterm delivery, macrosomia, perinatal morbidity and mortality [1 –3]. Moreover, offspring born to women with type 1 diabetes have a long-term increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes [1–4]. Tight glycemic control at the time of conception and during pregnancy is mandatory to reduce the risk of adverse outcomes, though maternal severe hypoglycemia is a ma jor barrier in achieving this goal [5].
Source: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Source Type: research
Maunil K. Desai1 and Roberta Diaz Brinton2,3* 1School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, United States 2Center for Innovation in Brain Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States 3Departments of Pharmacology and Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, United States Women have a higher incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases than men, and 85% or more patients of multiple autoimmune diseases are female. Women undergo sweeping endocrinological changes at least twice during their lifetime, puberty and menopause, with many women undergoin...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study aimed to compare the effect of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with moderate-intensity continuous training (MCT) on endothelial function, oxidative stress and clinical fitness in patients with type 1 diabetes. Thirty-six type 1 diabetic patients (mean age 23.5 ± 6 years) were randomized into 3 groups: HIIT, MCT, and a non-exercising group (CON). Exercise was performed in a stationary cycle ergometers during 40 min, 3 times/week, for 8 weeks at 50–85% maximal heart rate (HRmax) in HIIT and 50% HRmax in MCT. Endothelial function was measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) [endothelium-depende...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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