Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines

(American Chemical Society) Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting inACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sustained release of vaccine components, increasing the potency, quality and duration of immune responses in mice.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Journal of Genetics and GenomicsAuthor(s): Chengqi Wang, Justin Gibbons, Swamy R. Adapa, Jenna Oberstaller, Xiangyun Liao, Min Zhang, John H. Adams, Rays H.Y. Jiang
Source: Journal of Genetics and Genomics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Emergency-use authorizations, a formerly obscure corner of regulatory law, have become a centerpiece of the government ’s response to the pandemic.
Source: NYT - Category: American Health Authors: Tags: your-feed-science Coronavirus Risks and Safety Concerns Food and Drug Administration Hahn, Stephen M (1960- ) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Vaccination and Immunization Clinical Trials Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) your-feed-health your-feed-healthc Source Type: news
The use of an immune-system stimulant harvested from shark liver oil in the development of some coronavirus vaccines has animal conservationists pressing for alternatives.(Image credit: Reinhard Dirscherl/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
Source: NPR Health and Science - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Abdeta D, Kebede N, Giday M, Terefe G, Abay SM Abstract Microbial resistance to the few conventional antitrypanosomal drugs, increasing resistance of vectors to insecticides, lack of effective vaccines, and adverse effects of the existing antitrypanosomal drugs justify the urgent need for effective, tolerable, and affordable drugs. We assessed antitrypanosomal effects of the hydromethanolic extract of Echinops kebericho Mesfin roots against Trypanosoma congolense field isolate using in vitro and in vivo techniques. Parasite load, packed cell volume (PCV), body weight, and rectal temperature in Swiss albino...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the crude extract of A. hispidum DC, one of the plants used traditionally to treat malaria, inhibits the growth of P. falciparum in vitro and could be a potential source of antimalarial drug. The report has highlighted genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the selected plant extracts on human leukocytes as well. PMID: 33029160 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Phoenix Children ’s Hospital held its fourth annual flu POD (point of distribution) this week, with this year's 13-hour blitz holding a special significance amid the global Covid-19 pandemic. On Oct. 7, nurses began vaccinating employees at 6 a.m. and concluded the one-day event at 7 p.m., vaccinating nearly 5,00 0 people. It’s preparation for another potential mass vaccination event: distribution of a safe and effective vaccine for Covid-19. Click through the photo gallery above to see scenes…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - Category: Biotechnology Authors: Source Type: news
Authors: Schlipköter U, Flahault A Abstract The past two centuries have seen enormous achievements in control of infectious diseases, previously the leading cause of death, in large measure due to sanitation and food safety, vaccines, antibiotics and improved nutrition. This has led people to put their faith in the notion that medical science would succeed in overcoming the remaining obstacles. Vaccination has eradicated smallpox, nearly eradicated poliomyelitis and greatly reduced many other highly dangerous infections such as diphtheria, tetanus and measles. New diseases such as HIV and new forms of influenz...
Source: Public Health Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Rev Source Type: research
Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been developed. In the second golden age, the cell culture technology enabled polio, measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines be dev...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
Conclusion The vaccination comprises a misguided and unsafe national health care program which claims to prevent disease. Many significant health injuries are associated with vaccinating adults. Government resources are being spent researching and developing new and different vaccinations. Subjecting adults to more vaccinations is likely to cause more health injury and illness. References: http://www.vaccinationcouncil.org/2012/07/05/herd-immunity… http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/overview/ http://www.vaccinationcouncil.org/2011/02/18/60-lab-studies… http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/adult.html...
Source: vactruth.com - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Logical Michelle Goldstein Recent Articles Top Stories adult vaccination adult vaccines new vaccines shingles vaccine truth about vaccines Source Type: blogs
Anti-infectious human vaccination in historical perspective. Int Rev Immunol. 2015 Nov 25;:1-32 Authors: D'Amelio E, Salemi S, D'Amelio R Abstract A brief history of vaccination is presented since the Jenner's observation, through the first golden age of vaccinology (from Pasteur's era to 1938), the second golden age (from 1940 to 1970), until the current period. In the first golden age, live, such as Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), and yellow fever, inactivated, such as typhoid, cholera, plague, and influenza, and subunit vaccines, such as tetanus and diphtheria toxoids, have been deve...
Source: International Reviews of Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Int Rev Immunol Source Type: research
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