Admission Carboxyhemoglobin: Is It a Marker for Burn Patient Outcomes?

Background Carbon monoxide is a gas produced by the combustion of hydrocarbon products that binds to heme molecules, 240 times more than oxygen, producing carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). As a result of its high affinity, there is shift of the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve, compromising oxygen transport and delivery to tissues. Our study aim was to evaluate COHb elevation on admission as a predictor of worse outcomes in burn patients. Methods This is a 10-year retrospective review of the American Burn Association Burn Registry from 2002 to 2011. We stratified the patients into 2 groups: adult patients with normal COHb on admission (group 1) versus elevated COHb (group 2). Elevated COHb levels were defined as greater than 10% on the first arterial blood gas. Outcome measures included in-hospital mortality rate, hospital length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit LOS (ICU-LOS), and ventilator days. χ2 and t test analyses were used with significance defined as a P value of less than 0.05. Results A total of 6365 burn patients meet our inclusion criteria. There were 5775 patients in group 1 and 590 patients in group 2. Group 1 had an average age of 39.29 years compared with 42.62 years in group 2. The total body surface area was higher in group 1 compared with group 2 (6.24 vs 4.65) and with a statistically significant increase in partial thickness burns at 4.97 in group 1 compared with 3.27 in group 2. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups...
Source: Annals of Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Burn Surgery and Research Source Type: research

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BACKGROUND: Carbon monoxide is a gas produced by the combustion of hydrocarbon products that binds to heme molecules, 240 times more than oxygen, producing carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). As a result of its high affinity, there is shift of the oxyhemoglobin diss...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
This article attempts to lessen this bias by reviewing the benefits of HBOT in conditions where there is uniform acceptance of its role, such as carbon monoxide poisoning and decompression illness. It demonstrates that these conditions have similar pathophysiologic derangements to conditions commonly encountered by the reconstructive/wound care surgeon, including crush injuries, compartment syndrome, compromised flaps, and thermal burns. PMID: 32681876 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Surgical Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Surg Clin North Am Source Type: research
Environmental Science&TechnologyDOI: 10.1021/acs.est.9b07935
Source: Environmental Science and Technology - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: research
This article attempts to lessen this bias by reviewing the benefits of HBOT in conditions where there is uniform acceptance of its role, such as carbon monoxide poisoning and decompression illness. It demonstrates that these conditions have similar pathophysiologic derangements to conditions commonly encountered by the reconstructive/wound care surgeon, including crush injuries, compartment syndrome, compromised flaps, and thermal burns.
Source: Surgical Clinics of North America - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
The objectives of this study were to evaluate the acute effects of IQOS on pulmonary function in non-smokers and current smokers. Materials and Methods: Fifty male healthy non-smokers and current smokers with no known co-morbidity underwent an exhaled CO measurement, oximetry (SaO2%), pulmonary function tests (flows, volumes and diffusion capacity), and a measurement of respiratory resistances with an impulse oscillometry system (IOS) before and immediately after IQOS use. Results: In the whole group of 50 participants, SaO2%, forced expiratory flow at 25% and 50% of vital capacity (FEF 25%, FEF 50%, respectively), peak ex...
Source: Medicina (Kaunas) - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Medicina (Kaunas) Source Type: research
This study aims to assess the effects on indoor air quality of traditional tobacco cigarettes (TCs) and new smoking alternatives, to determine the differences between their potential impacts on human health. Measurements of particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10), black carbon, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were performed in two real life scenarios, in the home and in the car. The results indicated that the particle emissions from the different NDS devices were significantly different. In the home and car, the use of TCs resulted in higher PM10 and ultrafine particle concentrations than when e-cigarettes w...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Unintentional non-fire related (UNFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is a preventable cause of morbidity and mortality. Epidemiological data on UNFR CO poisoning can help monitor changes in the magnitude of this burden, particularly through comparisons of ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
An English theologian and natural philosopher, Joseph Priestley (1733 to 1804) discovered many gases, including “dephlogisticated air” or oxygen in 1774. However, his sympathies toward revolutionaries abroad and religious “Dissenters” at home soon made Priestley unpopular with the Crown and the Church of England. In 1791, he abandoned his English home in Birmingham just before an angry mob looted (left) and then burned it to the ground. Political and professional outcasts, Joseph and his wife Mary joined their children in America, settling in rural Northumberland, Pennsylvania, in 1794. Wasting no t...
Source: Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
This article examines how the initial absence of scientific data on the physiologic effects of flamethrowers led to an inaccurate understanding of their let hality, and bizarre claims that one of history’s most horrific instruments of war was considered one of the more “humane” weapons on the battlefield.
Source: Military Medical Research - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
(American Thoracic Society) Traditional stoves that burn biomass materials and are not properly ventilated, which are widely used in developing nations where cooking is done indoors, have been shown to significantly increase indoor levels of harmful PM2.5 (miniscule atmospheric particulates) and carbon monoxide (CO) and to stimulate biological processes that cause lung inflammation and may lead to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
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