What Is In A Ketogenic Diet?

Discussion Epilepsy is a common problem for the general pediatrician. Its incidence is estimated at 41-87/100,000 children. While many children are controlled with medication, it is also estimated that up to 1/3 will develop drug-resistant epilepsy. Some children may have an identifiable seizure focus that may be amenable to surgery, but many others do not. One option for potential control is a ketogenic diet (KD). Indications for KD usually are for drug-resistant epilepsy including partial and complex seizure patterns as well as some metabolic disorders such as glucose transport 1 deficiency syndrome. It has also found to be useful for some epileptic encephalopathies such as Doose, Dravet, Lennox-Gastaut, Ohthahara and West syndromes. KD is contraindicated in other conditions such as primary carnitine deficiency and other carnitine disorders, beta-oxidation defects, pyruvate carboxylase deficiency and porphyria. The exact mechanism for the KD efficacy is not known but ketone bodies, mainly beta-hydroxybutyrate, cross the blood brain barrier. They become the main energy source for the brain and regulate various neurotransmission processes including accelerated re-uptake of neurotransmitters and neuronal inhibition. KD can be effective with up to 50% reduction in seizures for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy within 6 months. The diet is used usually for a minimum of 2 years. Learning Point A KD needs to have dieticians and neurologists with expertise to oversee them....
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news