Post Traumatic Headache: Clinical care of athletes vs non athletes with Persistent Post Traumatic Headache after Concussion: Sports Neurologist and Headache Specialist Perspective

AbstractPurposeThe purpose of this paper is to review and outline the similarities and differences in the treatment of athletes compared with that of other populations with a persistent post-traumatic headache after a concussion.Recent FindingsAfter an extensive review of the literature and despite well over 2 million Americans experiencing post-traumatic headache (PTH) each year, a number of which will continue to experience persistent post-traumatic headache (PPTH). There is little evidence on the management of the disorder and essentially no evidence-based research when it comes to the management of athletes.SummaryWith little evidence available for the treatment of individuals with PPTH, be it athletes or non-athletes, the clinician will need to rely on their experience and the application of existing treatments for migraine and chronic migraine. Clearly, more research is needed, especially with respect to the management of athletes versus non-athletes.
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research

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Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
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Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Neurología (English Edition)Author(s): N. Morollón, R. Belvís, A. De Dios, N. Pagès, C. González-Oria, G. Latorre, S. Santos-Lasaosa
Source: Neurologia - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Fernando Lopes, Fernando A. Vicentini, Nina L. Cluny, Alexander J. Mathews, Benjamin H. Lee, Wagdi A. Almishri, Lateece Griffin, William Gonçalves, Vanessa Pinho, Derek M. McKay, Simon A. Hirota, Mark G. Swain, Quentin J. Pittman, Keith A. Sharkey
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Post-traumatic headache (PTH) is one of the most common, debilitating, and difficult symptoms to manage after a traumatic head injury. Although the mechanisms underlying PTH remain elusive, recent studies in rodent models suggest the potential involvement of calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP), a mediator of neurogenic inflammation, and the ensuing activation of meningeal mast cells (MCs), proalgesic resident immune cells that can lead to the activation of the headache pain pathway. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MCs to the development of PTH-like pain behaviors in a model of mild closed-head i...
Source: Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Conclusions: Pre-injury psychiatric and pre-injury headache/migraine symptoms are risk factors for worse functional and post-concussive outcomes at 3- and 6-months post-mTBI. mTBI patients presenting to acute care should be evaluated for psychiatric and headache/migraine history, with lower thresholds for providing TBI education/resources, surveillance, and follow-up/referrals. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01565551. Introduction Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In 2013 ~2.8 million TBI cases were recorded annually i...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Persistent post-traumatic headache (PTH) and chronic migraine (CM) often present with clinically overlapping features including prominent light sensitivity. Dynamic pupillometry is a promising new tool for evaluation of autonomically mediated responses to light in headache disorders, as they may differ between headache phenotypes. While our prior work has evaluated autonomic responses in chronic migraine and mild traumatic brain injury (aka concussion), differences in PTH and chronic migraine have not been explored.
Source: The Journal of Pain - Category: Materials Science Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewIn recent years, the awareness of the detrimental impact of concussion and mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) is becoming more apparent. Concussive head trauma results in a constellation of cognitive and somatic symptoms of which post-traumatic headache is the most common. Our understanding of post-traumatic headache is limited by the paucity of well validated, characterized, and clinically relevant animal models with strong predictive validity. In this review, we aim to summarize and discuss current animal models of concussion/mTBI and related data that start to shed light on the pathophysiology...
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) are common pediatric injuries. Headaches are one of the most common and disabling complaints following concussion in the acute phase and are pervasive in those who have prolonged symptoms following concussion. The body of evidence regarding the epidemiology of and risk factors for pediatric concussion and post-traumatic headache is growing rapidly, but there still is a distinct lack of strong scientific evidence to support the best treatment strategies for post-traumatic headaches in either children or adults. In this article, we will review the current ev...
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that active duty military patients with headaches related to concussions may benefit from treatment with OBA. Further studies are indicated. PMID: 25644249 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Headache - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Headache Source Type: research
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