Peer Review Finds EPA ’s Asbestos Risk Evaluation Flawed

The Science Advisory Committee on Chemicals found considerable failings and an underestimation of danger to the general public in a draft risk evaluation of asbestos submitted earlier this year by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. SACC, which serves as a scientific, peer-review mechanism for the EPA, released its recommendations last week in the ongoing governmental reevaluation of asbestos. This is the latest step in the amended Toxic Substances Control Act that requires the EPA to conduct evaluations on specific chemicals to determine whether they present unreasonable risk under conditions of use. The committee was comprised of 14 scientists, medical doctors and Ph.D.s from around the country, along with another 10 ad hoc peer reviewers with asbestos experience. SACC’s ad hoc panel had several members who routinely testify on behalf of plaintiffs in asbestos litigation, but no experts who testify on behalf of defendants. They met for four days in June to dissect the EPA’s original draft risk evaluation of the dangers of asbestos exposure. “Overall, EPA’s environmental and human health risk evaluations for asbestos was not considered adequate and results in low confidence in the conclusions,” according to the executive summary. “This [draft risk evaluation] does not fit the reality of total exposure to asbestos,” the summary concluded. “The estimate for total exposure to asbestos is deficient. This DRE includes only a limited slice of the exposure.”...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news