Featured Review: Psychological therapies for the management of chronic pain (excluding headache) in adults

Many people experience pain that lasts more than three months that is neither cancer ‐related nor a headache. The search for a diagnosis and pain relief is often long and can be discouraging.  In this interview, lead author of the recently updated Cochrane ReviewPsychological therapies for the management of chronic pain (excluding headache) in adults  Amanda C de C Williams discusses the findings of this review.Can you tell us about this Cochrane Review and what is new about this update?This review is the third in Cochrane, and the fourth overall, attempting to answer the question of efficacy of psychological interventions to help people with chronic (persistent) pain. These interventions use a variety of methods targeting behaviour, thoughts, and emotions, to try to enable people with chronic pain to lead more satisfying lives, less limited by pain. These interventions have been used now for about 50 years, and there have been many trials. This review included 75 studies, with 9401 patients completing treatment. This was much larger than our previous Cochrane review in 2012, so we hoped to get a clearer answer as to whether these interventions reduced disability, distress, and pain.What does the evidence tell us?We divided the interventions into three groups. The largest was cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), which aims to help people identify and change unhelpful habits of thinking, and over-pessimistic beliefs about their pain and what it means, alongside ways of enc...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news