Noninvasive Brain Stimulation Does Not Improve Neuropathic Pain in Individuals With Spinal Cord Injury: Evidence From a Meta-Analysis of 11 Randomized Controlled Trials

Conclusions In individuals with spinal cord injury, no significant effects of noninvasive brain stimulation on neuropathic pain and depression were observed. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation may be beneficial for the management of anxiety. These findings do not support the routine use of noninvasive brain stimulation for neuropathic pain in individuals with spinal cord injury.
Source: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: Original Research Articles Source Type: research

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Source: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: Cell Mol Neurobiol Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
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Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news
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