Global COVID-19 Efforts as the Platform to Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

AbstractPurpose of ReviewIn this commentary, we summarize and put into perspective the recent information that highlights the associations between coronavirus disease and poverty. We also bring attention to another dimension that will most likely exacerbate the severity and long-term sequelae of COVID-19 in impoverished populations, that is, the comorbidities and the presence of tropical infections.Recent FindingsDuring this first half of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has emerged as a poverty-related neglected disease on at least two fronts. First, is its significant impact in low-income neighborhoods in the USA, the epicenter of the pandemic. Second, is its emergence in poor urban areas of South America, and now in Asia and Africa. In both fronts, the pandemic is contributing heavily towards the loss of public health gains that we managed to achieve globally during the last two decades. Specifically, any advances made as part of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (United Nations,2020) is eroding, and for the first time, the number of people entering extreme poverty is increasing. Adding to this descent into poverty are new disruptions in ongoing disease control programs, routine vaccination strategies, and a reduction of capacity building efforts globally. Therefore, and as highlighted by many others, we support the notion that a way forward to eliminate this coronavirus pandemic should include linking COVID-19 control to other tropical or poverty-related diseases...
Source: Current Tropical Medicine Reports - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research

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