Central Venous Catheters Complications in the Pediatric Cardiac ICU—The Devil Is in the Details*

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Source: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine - Category: Pediatrics Tags: Editorials Source Type: research

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Authors: Banasik M, Dawiskiba T, Letachowicz K, Zmonarski S, Mazanowska O, Lipiak E, Miś M, Janczak D, Krajewska M Abstract A 52-year-old woman after renal transplantation developed unilateral pleural effusion as well as a massive edema of the upper limb, breast, and face as a complication of the subclavian vein catheterization and arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis. We revealed that impaired venous drainage due to extensive vein occlusion after temporary catheter insertion, together with high venous flow from the arteriovenous fistula, were the explanation. Because of moderately impaired renal graft function ...
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
Authors: Gołębiowski T, Konieczny A, Letachowicz K, Krajewska M, Kusztal M Abstract Central venous catheter (CVC) for hemodialysis are frequently implanted to the internal jugular vein. Thyroid cysts are commonly shown in ultrasound examination and their recognition should not pose a problem. Herby we present an uncommon case of the thyroid cyst unintended puncture, during an attempt of CVC insertion. No further clinical consequences were observed. For all practitioners, involved in interventional nephrology, such complication may be of the utmost importance. PMID: 32985345 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our data suggest that PICC is safe and effective in pediatric and young adult patients receiving long-term treatment. However, clinicians should be aware of the possible complications during PICC use.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI) remains a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality for cancer patients. With a better understanding of it, better methods can be used. The primary objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of BSIs in our institution, and the second was to determine the possible risk factors associated with them. Materials and Methods: Data of cancer patients from 2009 to 2015 at our institution were included. Medical information and blood cultures were analyzed to determine the BSI rate. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used for categorical data and to determine risk...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Online Articles: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study showed that pediatric patients with CNS tumors require significantly less frequent administration of tPA for episodes of CVC dysfunction than patients with non-CNS tumors after adjusting for confounding factors. Hypotheses for this include: potential biologic differences of tumors, the role of the blood-brain barrier, or systematic differences in intensity of treatments.
Source: Journal of Pediatric Hematology Oncology - Category: Hematology Tags: Online Articles: Clinical and Laboratory Observations Source Type: research
Vasopressors are mainstay treatment for patients in shock and are usually infused through central venous catheters (CVCs). However, CVCs are associated with risk of infection or delay from the needs of confirmation of placement. Infusing vasopressor through peripheral venous catheter (PIVs) could be an alternative in the Emergency Departments (ED) but data regarding complications is inconclusive. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis to assess literature involving prevalence of complications from infusing vasopressors via PIVs.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Background: Chlorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine coated central venous catheters (CSS-CVC) may cause loss of antimicrobial efficacy due to friction between the CVC surface and sheer stress caused by the blood flow. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial efficacy of CSS-CVC at various flow rates using a bloodstream model. Methods: Each CVC was subjected to various flow rates (0.5, 1, 2, and 4 L/min) and wear-out times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours), and the optical density (OD) 600 after a Staphylococcus aureus incubation test was used to determine the antibacterial effect of CSS...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Trial/Experimental Study Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: The SRR provides a reliable resource on current vascular access care. PMID: 32951502 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Vascular Access - Category: Surgery Tags: J Vasc Access Source Type: research
Extravasation injury resulting from intravenous therapies delivered via peripheral intravenous catheters or umbilical and peripherally inserted central venous catheters is a common iatrogenic complication occu...
Source: BMC Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Conditions:   Central Line Complication;   Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection (CLABSI) Intervention:   Device: Tetrasodium EDTA Catheter Lock Solution Sponsors:   Boston Children's Hospital;   SterileCare Inc. Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
More News: Central Venous Catheterization | Pediatrics