Seven evidence-based reasons to start meditating yesterday

Yes, starting today is OK too. I started meditating soon after 9/11. I was living in Manhattan, an already chaotic place, at an extremely chaotic time. I realized I had no control over my external environment. But the one place I did have a say over was my mind, through meditation. When I started meditating, I did not realize it would also make me healthier, happier, and more resilient. Having witnessed the benefits, I devoted my PhD research at Stanford to studying the impact of meditation. I saw people from diverse backgrounds from college students to combat veterans benefit. In the last 10 years, hundreds of studies have been released. Here are seven evidence-based reasons you might want to get on the bandwagon as soon as you can: 1. It Changes Your BRAIN for the better Increases grey matter (good study here) Increases volume in areas related to emotion regulation, positive emotions &self-control (see here and here) Increases cortical thickness in areas related to paying attention (see here) 2. It Boosts Your Self-Control Improves your ability to regulate your emotions and quiet your mind (see here) Improves your ability to introspect (here) 3. It Makes You Wiser … by giving you perspective. By observing your mind, you realize you don’t have to be slave to it. You realize it throws tantrums, gets grumpy, jealous, happy and sad but that it doesn’t have to run you. Meditation is quite simply mental hygiene: clear out the junk, tune your t...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness brain emotion regulation happiness meditation mental hygiene mind productivity self-control Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Conclusions and relevanceCOVID-19 pandemic had an overall negative impact on patients with migraine. Several risk factors for poor outcome were identified. Long-term strategies should be validated and implemented to deliver quality care for patients with migraine, with emphasis on psychosocial well-being.
Source: The Journal of Headache and Pain - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Now that we’re in the middle of a pandemic, more people than ever are experiencing anxiety, especially those who struggled with mental health issues before COVID-19. And to make things even worse, many of our coping mechanisms, like going to the gym or hanging out with friends, have been taken away. In today’s show, our host, Gabe Howard, talks with Dr. Jasleen Chhatwal, who helps explain why so many people are having anxiety symptoms and what we can do about it. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking the graphic below! SUBSCRIBE &REVIEW   Guest informatio...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Disorders Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
Rapid review question: What are the medium- and long-term health sequelae of COVID-19 infection among survivors? In brief: General health sequelae • Symptoms commonly reported among recovered COVID-19 patients two to eight weeks after the onset of symptoms (or a positive COVID-19 test) include: fatigue, shortness of breath, muscle or joint pain, chest pain, cough, and insomnia and/or sleep disorders.(1-6) • A study of 202 confirmed COVID -19 patients with mild symptoms, found altered sense of smell or taste occurred in 18.6% of patients, feelings of being tired in 13.1%, problems breathing in 10.4% and muscle or ...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
BOSTON (CBS) – This back to school season is particularly stressful for many children. In addition to the normal jitters kids get, they have so many other things to think about this year with the coronavirus pandemic and all the changes it brings. Children might be worried they will get sick or make their family members sick. They may be afraid to leave home and their parents. They may worry about failing to follow the new school rules like wearing masks and keeping a safe distance from others. Their schedules could change at a moment’s notice depending on the newest guidelines. They may worry they won’t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Syndicated Local Anxiety Back To School Coronavirus Source Type: news
Mikayla Mace A University of Arizona pharmacologist discusses how the conditions created by the pandemic and the response could be exacerbating drug use and overdose. Monday University Communicationssad-505857_1920.jpgHealthCOVID-19Researcher contact: Todd W. Vanderah Comprehensive Pain and Addiction Center 520-626-7801vanderah@email.arizona.eduMedia contact: Mikayla Mace University Communications 520-621-1878mikaylamace@arizona.edu For the latest on the University of Arizona response to the novel coronavirus, visit the university'sCOVID-19 webpage.For UANews coverage of COVID-19, visithttps://uanews.arizona.edu/...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Pandemics can be indiscriminate, with viruses making no distinctions among the victims they attack and those they spare. If you’re human, you’ll do. COVID-19 has been different, particularly when it comes to age. The disease has shown a special animus for older people, with those 65-plus considered at especially high risk for hospitalization and death, and those 18 and below catching a semblance of an epidemiological break. Though a small share of adolescents have suffered severe cases, most who contract the disease in that age cohort are likelier to experience milder symptoms or none at all. But if COVID-19 is...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
Abstract COVID-19 has brought the world into uncharted waters. Many countries are under lockdown, the economy has ground to a halt, and almost everyone is afraid of dire consequences. The unprecedented changes that came on so quickly due to the pandemic and stay-at-home confinement to accomplish social distancing and mitigate risk for infection pose many challenges. These include compromised health, well-being, and sleep as a consequence of disruption of the daily life routine, anxiety, worry, isolation, greater family and work stress, and excessive screen time. Our study of 203 corporate sector professionals perf...
Source: Chronobiology International - Category: Biology Authors: Tags: Chronobiol Int Source Type: research
Since the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, most attention has focused on containing transmission of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and addressing the surge of critically ill patients in acute care settings. Indeed, as of 29 April 2020, over 3 million confirmed cases have been accounted for globally [1]. In the coming weeks and months, emphasis will gradually involve also post-acute care of COVID-19 survivors. It is anticipated that COVID-19 may have a major impact on physical, cognitive, mental and social health status, also in patients with mild disease presen...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Articles: Correspondence Source Type: research
Jeffrey A. SingerWhite House “drug czar” Jim Carroll toldPolitico earlier this week that an Office of National Drug Control Policy analysis finds an 11.4 percent year ‐​over‐​year increase in opioid‐​related overdose deaths during the first four months of 2020. Kentucky has seen a 25 percent increase in overdose deaths during the first four months of this year, and West Virginia saw a 50 percent increase in deaths since the beginning of the year. The data are incomplete at this point, and not all states have reported in.Mr. Carroll attributed much of the increase in the overdose rate ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
AbstractQuarantine is a well-known risk factor for psychological and psychiatric disturbances. We evaluated burden of migraine during lockdown due to COVID 19 pandemia. Forty-nine subjects followed in our headache clinic for migraine were evaluated for migraine burden by means of global assessment of migraine severity (GAMS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) by phone interview. Moreover, depression and anxiety were quantified by Beck depression inventory (BDI) and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). We evaluated changes in the value of migraine score from the 2 months immediately before lockdown (from January 1 to March 9)...
Source: Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
More News: Anxiety | Brain | COVID-19 | Depression | Education | Environmental Health | Internet | Learning | Men | Neurology | Neuroscience | Pain | Science | Sports Medicine | Students | Study | Training | Universities & Medical Training