Acute non-traumatic subdural hematoma induced by intracranial aneurysm rupture: A case report and systematic review of the literature

Rationale: Intracranial aneurysm with the first manifestation of acute subdural hematoma (aSDH) is rare in the field of neurosurgery. Usually subarachnoid hemorrhage or intracranial hematoma happens after the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, whereas trauma is the primary cause of aSDH. Patient concerns: Here, we present the case of a 71-year-old woman who presented with spontaneous aSDH with progressive headache and vomiting. Diagnosis: Urgent head computed tomography (CT) identified an aSHD, but the patient had no history of trauma. CT angiography (CTA) identified the cause of the aSDH as rupture of an intracranial aneurysm in the left middle cerebral artery. Interventions: Emergent craniotomy with hematoma evacuation was performed. Outcomes: Due to prompt diagnosis and appropriate intervention, the patient recovered fully with no disability. Lessons: This unique case demonstrates that aSDH caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture requires timely identification and appropriate action to prevent adverse outcomes. We performed a comprehensive systematic literature review to examine the etiology and pathogenesis of non-traumatic aSDH. Furthermore, digital subtraction angiography should be considered in patients diagnosed with an aSDH with no known cause.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research

Related Links:

CONCLUSION: Most subarachnoid haemorrhage survivors in both cohorts had unmet needs. Future research should aim to inform the development of post-discharge services to address the persistent long-term needs identified. Implications for rehabilitation Subarachnoid haemorrhage survivors report a number of needs 1-2 years and 3-5 years post haemorrhage. Needs relating to fatigue, memory, concentration, headache and anxiety were the most commonly reported. A large proportion of needs were described as unmet. The design of rehabilitation services for subarachnoid haemorrhage survivors should consider the self-reported needs des...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
Publication date: May 2017 Source:Journal of the American College of Radiology, Volume 14, Issue 5, Supplement Author(s): Michael B. Salmela, Shabnam Mortazavi, Bharathi D. Jagadeesan, Daniel F. Broderick, Judah Burns, Tejaswini K. Deshmukh, H. Benjamin Harvey, Jenny Hoang, Christopher H. Hunt, Tabassum A. Kennedy, Alexander A. Khalessi, William Mack, Nandini D. Patel, Joel S. Perlmutter, Bruno Policeni, Jason W. Schroeder, Gavin Setzen, Matthew T. Whitehead, Rebecca S. Cornelius, Amanda S. Corey Diseases of the cerebral vasculature represent a heterogeneous group of ischemic and hemorrhagic etiologies, which often manife...
Source: Journal of the American College of Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Non traumatic (spontaneous) subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) represents about 5% of cerebrovascular pathology and it is associated with the significant rate of complications such as rebleeding (within first four weeks), with significant mortality (up to half of patients die within three weeks) and long term disability (a third of survivors remain dependent) [1 –3]. Unfortunately, the initially presenting symptoms of SAH are manifold and can be subtle and overlap with commonly frequent conditions, such as coexisting patients‘ diseases or its complications.
Source: Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Source Type: research
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a rare cerebrovascular disorder affecting large- and medium-sized arteries, occurring most commonly in young women. Thunderclap headache is the usual primary symptom; seizure is uncommon. During the postpartum period, seizure is a significant concern. The main causes of postpartum seizures are posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and cortical venous thrombosis; RCVS-related postpartum seizure is rare. Despite its rarity, its course may be fulminant, resulting in permanent disability or death if the diagnosis is delayed and treatment is not started promptly.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe he...
Source: Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
Abstract Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as ...
Source: Headache - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Headache Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: In this observational study, duration from symptom onset to hospital presentation was not independently associated with death or severe disability at hospital discharge following SAH. Age and H+H score were independent predictors of clinical outcome after non-traumatic SAH. PMID: 22338211 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: Canadian Journal of Neuroscience Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Can J Neurosci Nurs Source Type: research
Conclusions Individualized keyhole approach for posterior cerebral circulation artery aneurysms is safe and effective. Anterior clinoid process or posterior clinoid process could be drilled to offer a wide operative space for clipping. Utilizing multiple working windows is very helpful for controlling the parent artery and clipping the aneurysm.
Source: World Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Source Type: research
Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a medical emergency that can be life-threatening or lead to severe disability even if recognized and managed early. Majority of spontaneous SAHs arise from a ruptured saccular aneurysm. However, up to 15% of SAHs do not have a bleeding source and are termed non-aneurysmal SAH. While sudden, severe headache is classically associated with aneurysmal SAHs, non-aneurysmal SAHs tend to have a more gradual onset headache and can even present with transient amnesia in about one-third of patients.
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
More News: Angiography | Brain | Craniotomy | CT Scan | Disability | Headache | Internal Medicine | Lessons | Migraine | Neurology | Neurosurgery | Subarachnoid Hemorrhage