Why Is Covid-19 More Deadly Than Ebola? An Infectious Disease Doctor Explains

Dr. Mark Kortepeter, a physician and biodefense expert who formerly worked at the U.S. Army “hot zone” research lab, explains the math behind how Covid-19 death tolls are overtaking deadlier viruses.
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Business /business Policy /policy Editors' Pick editors-pick Decision Maker decision-maker Coronavirus Source Type: news

Related Links:

Purpose of review To highlight the lessons learned from the Ebola outbreak that may inform our approach to the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly related to the widespread disruption of healthcare, ophthalmic disease manifestations, and vision health systems strengthening for future outbreaks. Recent findings Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), first detected in China in December 2019, has become a worldwide health emergency, with significant disruption of all aspects of society, including travel, business, and medical care. Although this pandemic has had unprecedented effects on healthcare delivery in the United States...
Source: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Tags: COVID19: Edited by Allen Chiang and Prithvi Mruthyunjaya Source Type: research
tam Ghosh Cardiac glycosides (CGs) have a long history of treating cardiac diseases. However, recent reports have suggested that CGs also possess anticancer and antiviral activities. The primary mechanism of action of these anticancer agents is by suppressing the Na+/k+-ATPase by decreasing the intracellular K+ and increasing the Na+ and Ca2+. Additionally, CGs were known to act as inhibitors of IL8 production, DNA topoisomerase I and II, anoikis prevention and suppression of several target genes responsible for the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, CGs were reported to be effective against several DNA...
Source: Molecules - Category: Chemistry Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Many of the warnings issued after the response to Ebola went unheeded -- and those mistakes have repeated themselves in the world's response to coronavirus.Medscape Public Health
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Public Health & Prevention Expert Interview Source Type: news
Religions for Peace Interreligious Council of Albania distributing Covid relief supplies from the Multi-religious Humanitarian Fund. Credit: Erzen CarjaBy Prof. Azza KaramNEW YORK, Aug 4 2020 (IPS) — I have never been interested in religion or spirituality before, but I found myself tuning in to all sorts of on-line religion and spirituality related forums “in search of something.” These are the words of a 30-something single young, middle class man (born into a Protestant-Catholic family background) in a European country. The latter is known more for turning several churches into museums or shopping ce...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Civil Society Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
(WASHINGTON) — Once a coronavirus vaccine is approved as safe and effective, Americans should have widespread access within a reasonable time, Dr. Anthony Fauci assured lawmakers Friday. Appearing before a House panel investigating the nation’s response to the pandemic, Fauci expressed “cautious” optimism that a vaccine would be available, particularly by next year. “I believe, ultimately, over a period of time in 2021, that Americans will be able to get it,” Fauci said, referring to the vaccine. There will be a priority list for who gets early vaccinations. “I don’t think we...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Congress COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
Emmanuel, a Luminos teacher, with his class in Loweh, Liberia (2019). Credit: Carielle Doe for the Luminos FundBy George K. Werner and Caitlin BaronKAMPALA, Uganda, Jul 30 2020 (IPS) “It has gotten really tough for us,” says James, a father in rural Liberia, of COVID-19 lockdown and school closures. “My son is trying but he is missing his friends and teachers. Children want to be in school.” “When Coronavirus passes, will your school still be there to help us with our children?” asks Fatu, a Liberian mother of six. Around the world, over one billion children are out of school. All will ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Africa Aid Featured Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Reducing deforestation and the exploitation of wildlife are the first steps in breaking the chain of disease emergenceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIn late 2013, in the village of Meliandou in rural Guinea, a group of children playing near a hollow tree disturbed a small colony of bats hiding inside. Scientists think that Emile Ouamouno, who later became the first tragic “index” case in the west AfricanEbola outbreak, was likely exposed to bat faeces whileplaying near the tree.Every pandemic starts like this. An innocuous human activity, such as eating wildlife, can spark an ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Ebola Sars Aids and HIV Deforestation Conservation Environment Trees and forests Science World news Source Type: news
Teresa Joseph Thanks to a U.S. Department of Defense contract for as much as $9.5 million, the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix and partners aim to develop a portable device to easily and accurately detects biological threats, including the virus that causes COVID-19. Today College of Medicine – Phoenix2017.07.28 ANBM Lab Shoot-1854-web-web.jpg Researchers in the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine in the College of Medicine – Phoenix work to create devices and diagnostics focused on personalized medicine. The center is leading an effort to develop a device for easy, qu...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
auria COVID-19 is a pandemic health emergency faced by the entire world. The clinical treatment of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) CoV-2 is currently based on the experimental administration of HIV antiviral drugs, such as lopinavir, ritonavir, and remdesivir (a nucleotide analogue used for Ebola infection). This work proposes a repurposing process using a database containing approximately 8000 known drugs in synergy structure- and ligand-based studies by means of the molecular docking and descriptor-based protocol. The proposed in silico findings identified new potential SARS CoV-2 main protease (MPRO) in...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Hypothesis Source Type: research
More News: Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Ebola | Infectious Diseases | Pharmaceuticals