Southeast Asia Has a Chance to Build Back Better Post-Pandemic

A boat on Pasig River in the Philippines. The Philippines has the highest mortality rate from the coronavirus in Southeast Asia. Credit:Kara Santos/IPS By Samira SadequeUNITED NATIONS, Jul 31 2020 (IPS) Southeast Asia’s response to the coronavirus pandemic has been efficient, but some areas such as data privacy, measures to go back to normalcy after lockdown is lifted, and resources for migrant or transient populations will need addressing.  United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres said while the pandemic has introduced new challenges in the region, including threats to peace and security, “containment measures have spared Southeast Asia the degree of suffering and upheaval seen elsewhere”.  Speaking at the launch of a U.N. policy brief exploring the impact of COVID-19 in Southeast Asia on Thursday, Jul. 30, Guterres lauded the efficient methods adapted by leaders in the region, while highlighting the ways in which the region has fallen short in its response to the pandemic.  “Already, hate speech has increased and political processes have stalled, leaving several long-running conflicts to stagnate and fester,” Guterres said during a video call marking the launch. He noted that while governments in Southeast Asia had supported his appeal for a global ceasefire, the region had much work to do, “but has formidable capacities at its disposal”. According to the think-tank Centre for Strategic and Inter...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Featured Food & Agriculture Global Governance Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Coronavirus CO Source Type: news

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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: The Medical Clinics of North America - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Revue d Epidemiologie et de Sante Publique - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized feature Magazine Misinformation & Disinformation Source Type: news
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Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Microbiology, Coronavirus (COVID-19) Biological Sciences Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature India overnight Source Type: news
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Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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