Cutaneous lesions due to babesiosis in a dog

Abstract A 5-year-old dog was identified suffering with recurrent skin lesions, fever, and progressive weight loss. Peripheral blood smear revealed presence of Babesia organisms. Dog had anemia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and it was treated with diminazene aceturate along with supportive therapy.
Source: Comparative Clinical Pathology - Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 11 September 2018Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Adi W. Naor, Dana M. Lindemann, Megan E. Schreeg, Henry S. Marr, Adam J. Birkenheuer, James W. Carpenter, Julia K. RyseffAbstractA possible novel Babesia species infection of a maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus) was first reported in 2012. The current case details a confirmed report of a maned wolf with infection by an undetermined species of Babesia. As the mortality and morbidity of babesiosis is high, this may become a significant concern to captive maned wolves, which are considered a near-threatened species by the World...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 February 2018 Source:Veterinary Parasitology Author(s): Jiawei Wang, Jilei Zhang, Patrick Kelly, Xiaofeng Zheng, Min Li, Jinfeng You, Ke Huang, Haixiang Qiu, Yaoyao Wang, Rong Zhang, Jianji Li, Junsheng Dong, Yi Feng, Jinlin Zhou, Chengming Wang Babesiosis is a tick-borne disease that occurs worldwide with the most recognized Babesia species that infect dogs being Babesia canis, B. vogeli, B. rossi and B. gibsoni. While B. vogeli is reported in dogs worldwide, clinical and laboratory data on infections is based on reports of naturally infected dogs. To provide reliable data on the cli...
Source: Veterinary Parasitology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 24 December 2017 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Agnesa Ćoralić, Simona Gabrielli, Amir Zahirović, Nikola M. Stojanović, Giovanni Luigi Milardi, Adnan Jažić, Almedina Zuko, Denis Čamo, Suzana Otašević Babesia spp. are tick-transmitted protozoan haemoparasites of great economic, veterinary and medical impact worldwide. Herein we reported the very high prevalence of autochthonous babesiosis in symptomatic dogs from Bosnia and Herzegovina in the period from 2014 to 2016. Eighty dogs that did not leave the country were examined using parasitological and molecul...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Abstract An 18‐year‐old male castrated jaguar (Panthera onca) was presented with anorexia and continuous bleeding from the oral cavity after a history of fighting with the partner animal. Clinical evaluation revealed ulcerating lesions on the gingiva and hard palate and a hematoma on the tongue. Computed tomography of the head and endoscopic examination of the esophagus and stomach were unremarkable. Hematology and clinical chemistry revealed severe nonregenerative anemia, mild thrombocytopenia, and moderate azotemia. Several PCRs for feline hemotropic mycoplasmas (Mycoplasma haemofelis, M heamominutium, M&nb...
Source: Veterinary Clinical Pathology - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Abstract Babesiosis is an increasingly recognized disease which may benefit from therapeutic apheresis (Category II/Grade 2C). Vulnerable populations include the splenectomized, those aged>50, those with malignancies, and the immunocompromised. In the setting of parasite levels > 10%, significant anemia, renal impairment, pulmonary compromise, or hepatic dysfunction, RBC exchange can rapidly reduce parasite burdens and decrease the bioavailability of proinflammatory cytokines. No previous report has shown such a rapid rebound in parasitemia despite adequate organism removal. Herein, we report a case of ...
Source: Journal of Clinical Apheresis - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 July 2016 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): Tarek Bouzouraa, Magalie René-Martellet, Jeanne Chêne, Charalampos Attipa, Isabelle Lebert, Karine Chalvet-Monfray, Jean-Luc Cadoré, Lenaig Halos, Luc Chabanne Since the first description of Anaplasma platys Infection (ApI), the disease has been sporadically reported worldwide. Whereas it is considered a subclinical disease in the United States or in Australia, severe cases are reported in Europe. Thus far, little information is available regarding the clinical and laboratory findings associated wit...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016 Source:Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases Author(s): J. Malheiros, M.M. Costa, R.B.do Amaral, K.C.Mde Sousa, M.R. André, R.Z. Machado, M.I.B. Vieira Dogs and cats are often infected with vector-borne pathogens and play a crucial role as reservoirs and hosts in their life cycles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of vector-borne pathogens among dogs and cats in the northwestern region of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) State, Brazil. One hundred and ten blood samples were collected from dogs (n=80) and cats (n=30). Laboratory analysis were carri...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: A 45-year old male patient with no significant past medical history presents with recurrent fevers, fatigue, arthralgias, and general malaise that have persisted for the past two months. He denies any weight loss, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, or headaches. He is a Boy Scout leader who spent the summer chaperoning at a Boy Scout camp. A physical examination shows fever, scleral icterus, and mild hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory studies reveal anemia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, thrombocytopenia, elevated total bilirubin, low haptoglobin, reticulocytosis, elevated liver enzymes, a...
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - Category: American Health Source Type: news
Discussion Humans are opportunistic hosts to Babesia when bitten by nymph or adult ticks; the most known ticks are Ixodes. Babesiosis should be considered in patients who have a malaria-like illness in areas endemic for Babesia infection. The symptoms usually begin 2–4 weeks after a tick bite. The presentation includes constitutional symptoms, abdominal pain and dark urine. Labs finding include hemolytic anemia and elevated liver enzymes. Urinalysis reveals hemoglobinuria without red blood cells. The diagnosis of Babesiosis is usually established by microscopic examination of Giems or Wright-stained blood smears, ind...
Source: Journal of Investigative Medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Infectious Disease Source Type: research
Conclusions and clinical importancePoor outcome in acute B. canis infection is indicated by changes in the laboratory profile. Intensive care should be considered for dogs presenting with moderate anemia, severe thrombocytopenia, mild to moderate leukopenia, hyperlactatemia, moderately increased serum phosphate, and triglyceride concentrations, and moderately decreased total serum protein concentrations.
Source: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Standard Article Source Type: research
More News: Anemia | Babesiosis | Papanicolaou (Pap) Smear | Pathology | Skin | Thrombocytopenia | Weight Loss