COVID-19: paediatric surveillance, PHE (updated 28th July 2020)

Children represent a small proportion of the total number of confirmed cases, with older adults and those with underlying co-morbidities particularly affected by the current global pandemic. Whilst this is reassuring for paediatricians, there are limited data on childhood SARS-CoV-19 infections, especially from Europe. 28 July 2020 Added updated sKIDs protocol. 12 June 2020 Added studies 5 to 7: RAPID-19 study; sKIDs COVID-19 surveillance in school children; and Multi-system inflammatory syndrome, Kawasaki disease and toxic shock syndrome.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Indian J Clin Biochem. 2021 Mar 6:1-12. doi: 10.1007/s12291-021-00963-4. Online ahead of print.ABSTRACTThe pandemic of COVID-19 initially appeared to cause only a mild illness in children. However, it is now apparent that a small percentage of children can develop a hyperinflammatory syndrome labeled as Pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome-temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) with a phenotype resembling Kawasaki disease (KD) ('Kawa-COVID-19'). Features of this newly recognized condition may include fever, hypotension, severe abdominal pain and cardiac dysfunction, evidence of inflammation, and single or m...
Source: Clinical Biochemistry - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Source Type: research
The volume of data and studies on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease caused by the novel coronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has grown at a pace as unprecedented as the pandemic itself. Statistics and findings change weekly. Although pediatric cases have thankfully remained a small minority (1.7 –2%) of overall worldwide COVID-19 cases (2), the potential for severe illness in children remains and grows. Rapidly published pediatric case series have identified severe critical COVID-19–related illnesses associated with primary SARS-CoV-2 infection and findings consiste...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), became a pandemic in March 2020, affecting millions of people worldwide. However, COVID-19 in pediatric patients represents 1-5% of all cases, and the risk for developing severe disease and critical illness is much lower in children with COVID-19 than in adults. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a possible complication of COVID-19, has been described as a hyperinflammatory condition with multiorgan involvement similar to that in Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome in children with evidence of SA...
Source: Clinics - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), became a pandemic in March 2020, affecting millions of people worldwide. However, COVID-19 in pediatric patients represents 1-5% of all cases, and the risk for developing severe disease and critical illness is much lower in children with COVID-19 than in adults. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a possible complication of COVID-19, has been described as a hyperinflammatory condition with multiorgan involvement similar to that in Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome in children with evidence of SA...
Source: Clinics - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), became a pandemic in March 2020, affecting millions of people worldwide. However, COVID-19 in pediatric patients represents 1-5% of all cases, and the risk for developing severe disease and critical illness is much lower in children with COVID-19 than in adults. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a possible complication of COVID-19, has been described as a hyperinflammatory condition with multiorgan involvement similar to that in Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome in children with evidence of SA...
Source: Clinics - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), became a pandemic in March 2020, affecting millions of people worldwide. However, COVID-19 in pediatric patients represents 1-5% of all cases, and the risk for developing severe disease and critical illness is much lower in children with COVID-19 than in adults. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a possible complication of COVID-19, has been described as a hyperinflammatory condition with multiorgan involvement similar to that in Kawasaki disease or toxic shock syndrome in children with evidence of SA...
Source: Clinics - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Authors: Cirks BT, Geracht JC, Jones OY, May JW, Mikita CP, Rajnik M, Helfrich AM Abstract The novel human coronavirus of 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has quickly swept throughout the entire world. As the ongoing pandemic has spread, recent studies have described children presenting with a multisystem inflammatory disorder sharing the features of Kawasaki disease (KD) and toxic shock syndrome, now named Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). These cases report a similar phenotype of prolonged fever, multisystem involvement, and biomarkers demonstrating marked h...
Source: Military Medicine - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Mil Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Most characteristics of the present MIS-C patients were similar to that of other cohorts. The present results may contribute to a broader understanding of SARS-CoV-2 infection in children and its short-term consequences. Long-term multidisciplinary follow-up is needed, since it is not known whether these patients will have chronic cardiac impairment or other sequelae. PMID: 33186512 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Jornal de Pediatria - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: J Pediatr (Rio J) Source Type: research
rapcak S, Datta D, Morris SB, Clarke K, Belay E, California MIS-C Response Team Abstract In April 2020, during the peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in Europe, a cluster of children with hyperinflammatory shock with features similar to Kawasaki disease and toxic shock syndrome was reported in England* (1). The patients' signs and symptoms were temporally associated with COVID-19 but presumed to have developed 2-4 weeks after acute COVID-19; all children had serologic evidence of infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 (1). The clinical signs and symptoms present in this fir...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
Abstract The pandemic of COVID-19 initially appeared to cause only a mild illness in children. However, it is now apparent that a small percentage of children can develop a hyperinflammatory syndrome labeled as Pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome - temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS). Features of this newly recognized condition may include persistent fever, evidence of inflammation, and single or multi organ dysfunction in the absence of other known infections. Some of these children may share features of Kawasaki disease, toxic shock syndrome or cytokine storm syndrome. They can deteriorate ra...
Source: Indian Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Indian Pediatr Source Type: research
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