Medications and Safety During Pregnancy

Medications and Safety During Pregnancy Women who take medication for anxiety, depression or other behavioral health conditions worry about whether they’ll need to discontinue use when they conceive. For years, well-intentioned care providers believed this to be the only clinically responsible solution. The reason for this was simple: because it’s considered unethical to test medication on pregnant and nursing mothers, there was no literature to provide evidence for safety.  But we’ve come a long way, and the field of perinatal psychiatry has evolved a great deal. We now have evidence that supports the safety and efficacy of certain medications for some women in the perinatal period from observation and practiced-based data. This is an important piece of the puzzle, as we also know from empirical and longitudinal studies that babies are at a much greater risk for developmental, cognitive and behavioral issues when one or both parents suffer from an untreated mental health condition.  Women who are currently on medications for conditions such as anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, OCD, etc.  should seek guidance from their midwives or OB GYNs. If the advice given doesn’t sit well, the next stop should be a consult with a reproductive psychiatrist or a general psychiatrist willing to work with pregnant women on a case-by-case basis.  This can all be confusing but finding a provider you trust who listens to your concerns and conside...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: Cord Blood Cord Tissue Source Type: blogs

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The role of motherhood is complex and profound. Psychology and development experts agree — the role of the mother is critical to child development, for better or worse. This role is also packed full of societal expectations and emotional milestones for an individual to navigate.  From the moment the pregnancy test confirms impending birth, an individual begins to conjure expectations they have of their own for this experience as well as what significant others, family members, friends, and society will hold for this new mother. While becoming a mother can be one of the most joyful and fulfilling passages of a wo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Depression Women's Issues Coping on Mother's Day Maternal Depression postpartum depression Source Type: blogs
Having a baby is a wonderfully happy time, right? For many women, it certainly is, but estimates show that 1 in 5 women who give birth will suffer from some type of perinatal mental illness, such as depression, anxiety, OCD or psychosis. Chances are, this includes someone you know. In today’s podcast, Dr. Katayune Kaeni, a psychologist who specializes in perinatal mental health and a sufferer herself, discusses these often confusing and debilitating disorders, particularly postpartum psychosis, a more rare and severe form of perinatal mental illness. Who is at risk? What does perinatal psychosis look like? And what ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Children and Teens Disorders General Interview Parenting Podcast Pregnancy The Psych Central Show Women's Issues Source Type: blogs
Often we don’t really consider gender dynamics in treatment or medication. A lot of medications are only tested on men because of the risk of pregnancy, etc. This means there are whole drugs that have made it to market that may not have ever been tested with women. Schizophrenia affects women in many different ways than men. In this episode schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers and cohost Gabe Howard discuss differences in age, symptoms, treatments, lifestyle, parenthood in the genders as they experience schizophrenia. Dr. Hayden Finch joins to explain the medical side.  Highlights in “Schizophrenia in Women...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Women's Issues Gender Differences Mental Disorder Mental Illness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Women's Health women's mental health Source Type: blogs
Authors: Johansen SL, Stenhaug BA, Robakis TK, Williams KE, Cullen MR Abstract OBJECTIVE: To compare risk for postpartum depression across prior psychiatric diagnoses. METHODS: The deidentified Optum© Clinformatics Data Mart of national commercial insurance claims was used to identify 1,166,577 women of reproductive age with first-observed incidence of pregnancy across all 50 United States from 2003 to 2016. Women with insurance coverage for at least 6 months prior to conception and following delivery were eligible (n = 336,522). Psychiatric diagnoses prior to pregnancy were identified by ICD-9-CM and ICD-...
Source: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: J Clin Psychiatry Source Type: research
I’ve been a mental health therapist for over 10 years and in the social work profession for more than 20. I have been pregnant 8 times, with 4 living children. I consider myself to be pretty self-aware, intelligent, and inquisitive. And yet… I had some form of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) with each of my pregnancies. I just didn’t know it. Oh, sure, I got sad and I got angry and with my older son, I couldn’t let myself fully bond to him until he was 9 months old, but I was fine, right? I even took medication, but that’s normal, right? I was introduced to PMADs last year when ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Parenting Personal Pregnancy Women's Issues Birth trauma perinatal anxiety disorder perinatal mood disorder Postpartum Disorder Source Type: blogs
Does Prenatal Stress Shape Postnatal Resilience? – An Epigenome-Wide Study on Violence and Mental Health in Humans Fernanda Serpeloni1,2, Karl M. Radtke1,3, Tobias Hecker4, Johanna Sill1, Vanja Vukojevic5, Simone G. de Assis2, Maggie Schauer1, Thomas Elbert1 and Daniel Nätt6* 1Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology, Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany 2Department of Studies in Violence and Health Jorge Careli, National School of Public Health of Rio de Janeiro – National Institute of Women, Children and Adolescents Health Fernandes Figueira, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, ...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Conclusion It is clear that clinically, there is still much to be learnt about alexithymia and its relationship with a range of related phenomena. Firstly, is alexithymia a continuous and stable trait independent of psychological or somatic symptomology that is developed during childhood? Or is it instead a reactive state induced by trauma and distress at any age, which serves to defend against intense and upsetting emotions? This impacts on treatment options. For example, should we be focussing on early childhood interventions which target the child's emotional environment and parenting to encourage emotional exp...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Sleep patterns in children and adolescents were related to the psychiatric diagnosis of their parent(s). Future follow-up of these results may clarify the relations between early sleep differences and the risk of developing mood disorders in individuals at high familial risk.IntroductionSleep disturbances are core symptoms of mood disorders including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (1). Additionally, sleep problems have been associated with more severe symptoms, greater functional impairment, and increased risk for relapse among individuals with mood disorders (2). Over 40% of children and youth...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Bipolar disorder affects men and women in equal numbers, and the symptoms are essentially identical. But some key differences do exist—differences that might be due to biological factors, and social ones, too. For starters, research has consistently shown that women have higher rates of bipolar II disorder, “which typically presents as a chronic depressive disorder with periods of hypomania,” according to Candida Fink, MD, a board-certified child, adolescent and adult psychiatrist with a private practice in Westchester, N.Y. There’s a misconception that bipolar II disorder is less severe than bipola...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Bipolar Disorders Gender General Men's Issues Women's Issues Bipolar Disorder bipolar disorder and pregnancy bipolar I Bipolar Ii Gender Differences men and bipolar disorder menopause and bipolar disorder menstruation and bipolar Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 12 November 2018Source: European Journal of Obstetrics &Gynecology and Reproductive BiologyAuthor(s): Brendan P. McDonnell, Sheila Keogan, Luke Clancy, Carmen ReganAbstractObjectiveMaternal cigarette smoking is a recognised risk factor for maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality and remains a significant problem in the Irish maternity system. Approximately 11% of Irish women will continue to smoke in pregnancy, despite awareness of the negative impact on their pregnancy. Although recommendations exist for the management of pregnant smokers, information on the antenatal care of Iris...
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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