Genes, Vol. 11, Pages 837: Therapeutic Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Update

Genes, Vol. 11, Pages 837: Therapeutic Strategies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: An Update Genes doi: 10.3390/genes11080837 Authors: Chengmei Sun Luoan Shen Zheng Zhang Xin Xie Neuromuscular disorders encompass a heterogeneous group of conditions that impair the function of muscles, motor neurons, peripheral nerves, and neuromuscular junctions. Being the most common and most severe type of muscular dystrophy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), is caused by mutations in the X-linked dystrophin gene. Loss of dystrophin protein leads to recurrent myofiber damage, chronic inflammation, progressive fibrosis, and dysfunction of muscle stem cells. Over the last few years, there has been considerable development of diagnosis and therapeutics for DMD, but current treatments do not cure the disease. Here, we review the current status of DMD pathogenesis and therapy, focusing on mutational spectrum, diagnosis tools, clinical trials, and therapeutic approaches including dystrophin restoration, gene therapy, and myogenic cell transplantation. Furthermore, we present the clinical potential of advanced strategies combining gene editing, cell-based therapy with tissue engineering for the treatment of muscular dystrophy.
Source: Genes - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research

Related Links:

UCLA researchers are part of an international team that reported the use of a stem cell gene therapy to treat nine people with the rare, inherited blood disease known as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, or X-CGD. Six of those patients are now in remission and have stopped other treatments. Before now, people with X-CGD – which causes recurrent infections, prolonged hospitalizations for treatment, and a shortened lifespan – had to rely on bone marrow donations for a chance at remission.“With this gene therapy, you can use a patient’s own stem cells instead of donor cells for a transplant,&rdqu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
This study demonstrates for the first time that senescent cells secrete functional LTs, significantly contributing to the LTs pool known to cause or exacerbate idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Against Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/against-senolytics/ There is no consensus in science that is so strong as to have no heretics. So here we have an interview with a naysayer on the matter of senolytic treatments, who argues that the loss of senescent cells in aged tissues will cause more harm to long-term health than the damage they will do by remaining. To be clear, I think this to be a ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 25 October 2019Source: Stem Cell ResearchAuthor(s): Lionel O. Mavoungou, Samuel Neuenschwander, Uyen Pham, Pavithra S. Iyer, Nicolas MermodABSTRACTDuchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal muscle-wasting disease caused by the lack of dystrophin in muscle fibers that is currently without curative treatment. Mesoangioblasts (MABs) are multipotent progenitor cells that can differentiate to a myogenic lineage and that can be used to express Dystrophin upon transplantation into muscles, in autologous gene therapy approaches. However, their fate in the muscle environment remains poorly...
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
In this study, we report the age-associated differences between fetal MSC (fMSC) populations and MSCs isolated from elderly donors with respect to their transcriptomes. We successfully reprogrammed fMSCs (55 days post conception) and adult MSC (aMSC; 60-74 years) to iPSCs and, subsequently, generated the corresponding iMSCs. In addition, iMSCs were also derived from ESCs. The iMSCs were similar although not identical to primary MSCs. We unraveled a putative rejuvenation and aging gene expression signature. We show that iMSCs irrespective of donor age and cell type re-acquired a similar secretome to that of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Reena Goswami1, Gayatri Subramanian2, Liliya Silayeva1, Isabelle Newkirk1, Deborah Doctor1, Karan Chawla2, Saurabh Chattopadhyay2, Dhyan Chandra3, Nageswararao Chilukuri1 and Venkaiah Betapudi1,4* 1Neuroscience Branch, Research Division, United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen, MD, United States 2Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, Toledo, OH, United States 3Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, United States 4Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University, Clev...
Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Publication date: July 2018Source: Stem Cell Research, Volume 30Author(s): Jinhong Meng, Francesco Muntoni, Jennifer MorganAbstractCell-mediated gene therapy is a possible means to treat muscular dystrophies like Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Autologous patient stem cells can be genetically-corrected and transplanted back into the patient, without causing immunorejection problems. Regenerated muscle fibres derived from these cells will express the missing dystrophin protein, thus improving muscle function.CD133+ cells derived from normal human skeletal muscle contribute to regenerated muscle fibres and form muscle stem cell...
Source: Stem Cell Research - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study provides three novel severely immune-deficient mouse muscular dystrophy models that will be useful in the development of successful gene and cell therapies. We also characterize the models to provide valuable baseline phenotypic information about them. Comparing the results between strains may elucidate further the phenotypic differences between these three forms of muscular dystrophy, although we note that since the strains are not fully inbred, differences in modifier genes may be present between them that could affect phenotype. Materials and Methods Ethics statement The Stanford Administrative Panel on ...
Source: PLOS Currents Muscular Dystrophy - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Brain | Clinical Trials | Gene Therapy | Genetics | Muscular Dystrophy | Neurology | Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy | Stem Cell Therapy | Stem Cells | Transplants