Drinking to cope with the pandemic: The unique associations of COVID-19-related perceived threat and psychological distress to drinking behaviors in American men and women.

Drinking to cope with the pandemic: The unique associations of COVID-19-related perceived threat and psychological distress to drinking behaviors in American men and women. Addict Behav. 2020 Jun 27;110:106532 Authors: Rodriguez LM, Litt DM, Stewart SH Abstract The 2019 Coronavirus pandemic has brought about significant and unprecedented changes to the modern world, including stay-at-home orders, high rates of unemployment, and more than a hundred thousand deaths across the United States. Derived from the self-medication hypothesis, this research explored how perceived threat and psychological distress related to the COVID-19 pandemic are associated with drinking behavior among an American sample of adults. We also evaluated whether links between COVID-19-related perceived threat and psychological distress with drinking behavior are different for men and women. Participants (N = 754; 50% women) completed an online Qualtrics Panels study between April 17th and 23rd, 2020. Results suggested that psychological distress related to the COVID-19 pandemic was consistently related to alcohol use indices, and moderation results indicated this pattern was significant only among women for number of drinks consumed during the recent heaviest drinking occasion and number of drinks consumed on a typical evening. COVID-related distress' link to frequency of drinking and heavy drinking episodes was not different for men and women. Our results suggest that cont...
Source: Addictive Behaviors - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addict Behav Source Type: research

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Conclusions: During the lockdown, individuals consumed slightly more alcohol and smoked marginally more cigarettes compared to the period before the lockdown. Further research focussing on follow-up of individuals at risk may be useful to provide appropriate care in post-COVID times.Eur Addict Res
Source: European Addiction Research - Category: Addiction Source Type: research
Mikayla Mace A University of Arizona pharmacologist discusses how the conditions created by the pandemic and the response could be exacerbating drug use and overdose. Monday University Communicationssad-505857_1920.jpgHealthCOVID-19Researcher contact: Todd W. Vanderah Comprehensive Pain and Addiction Center 520-626-7801vanderah@email.arizona.eduMedia contact: Mikayla Mace University Communications 520-621-1878mikaylamace@arizona.edu For the latest on the University of Arizona response to the novel coronavirus, visit the university'sCOVID-19 webpage.For UANews coverage of COVID-19, visithttps://uanews.arizona.edu/...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
Sara Wittner had seemingly gotten her life back under control. After a December relapse in her battle with drug addiction, the 32-year-old completed a 30-day detox program and started taking a monthly injection to block her cravings for opioids. She was engaged to be married, working for a local health advocacy group in Colorado, and counseling others about drug addiction. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The virus knocked down all the supports she had carefully built around her: no more in-person Narcotics Anonymous meetings, no talks over coffee with trusted friends or her addiction recovery sponsor. As the virus stressed...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Lippke Avoiding the potential negative impact brought by problematic internet use is becoming more important. To better understand public health and addiction, this study investigated to what extent work-time and leisure-time internet use relate to problematic internet use and perceived quality of life among college students and highly educated adults. An online cross-sectional survey with 446 individuals was assessed in Germany. Linear regression analyses were used to predict problematic internet use. Ordinal regression analyses were applied to predict perceived quality of life. Results showed that leisure-time inter...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Addiction specialists said it was possible for people who are drinking heavily and consistently during the coronavirus pandemic to develop a problem they did not have before.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcoholic Beverages Alcohol Abuse Shutdowns (Institutional) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Alcoholics Anonymous Quarantine (Life and Culture) Quarantines Source Type: news
I woke up a few days ago and forgave myself. For everything. It was ok to be me and every decision I had made, good or bad, was part of my upbringing, environment and genetic make-up. It’s ok that I am anxious and battle addictions. The stay at home order has enabled me to think, to analyze and to let go. I loved my parents, but boy, were they characters. My handsome Italian father, was obsessed with his weight and being a golf pro at a club on the south side of Chicago. That was his persona, his life, his true love. Playing golf, schmoozing and interacting with people who had a lot more money than he ever would have...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Abuse Addiction Anger Inspiration & Hope Personal Recovery Addiction Recovery Anger Management coronavirus COVID-19 Divorce Forgiveness pandemic Personal Growth Self-reflection Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs
If the COVID-19 pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that people have the capacity to change entrenched behaviors when the stakes are high enough. Who among us declared that 2020 would be the year for us to perfect the practice of physical distancing? Although we were clueless about pandemic practices a mere three months ago, we’ve adopted this new habit to avoid getting or spreading the virus. But what about other unhealthy behaviors that have the potential to shorten life spans across the US? On January 1, 2020, some of us made New Year’s resolutions aimed at improving our health: to eat less, lose wei...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Healthy Aging Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs
Have you had difficulty in your life? If so, it’s nothing to be ashamed of. The First Noble Truth of the Buddha is that life is difficult. Anguish, sorrow, and suffering are unavoidable features of our human existence. The Buddhist term for dissatisfaction is dukkha; to be alive is to experience dukkha.  The Buddha was not interested in creating a religion based on rigid beliefs or positive thinking. His approach is psychological in nature. He encouraged people to explore what was happening in their mind and heart — and to find their way forward by observing and listening to their own experience rather tha...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Dissociative Happiness Mindfulness Psychology Self-Help Spirituality Trauma Buddhist Psychology Compassion Empathy Shame Source Type: blogs
APA has joined the National Council for Behavioral Health, the American Society of Addiction Medicine, and 37 other mental health organizationsto urge Congress to approve $38.5 billion in emergency funding to support the behavioral health care system during the COVID-19 public health crisis. The funding would support Community Mental Health Centers, crisis service providers, and other organizations whose primary mission is to treat people who have mental or substance use disorders. A significant portion of the money would go to behavioral health organizations that provide care to Medicaid beneficiaries.The request comes at...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: access to care APA APA's advocacy tool COVID-19 emergency funding Medicaid National Council for Behavioral Health Saul Levin the American Society of Addiction Medicine Source Type: research
The COVID-19 crisis has created a time of uncertainty and anxiety for people around the world. Health professionals and other hospital staff are working around the clock to reduce and prevent the harmful consequences of the virus’s spread. Many people are uneasily wondering how they will manage their existing health problems when the support systems they normally rely on have been altered or eliminated. During this time, anxiety can cause an uncomfortable feeling in the pit of the stomach. It also can create a sense of behavioral paralysis and disengagement from daily tasks and obligations. This distance and sense of...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Alcohol Behavioral Health Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
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