Low- dose systemic steroids, an emerging therapeutic option for COVID-19 related urticaria.

Low- dose systemic steroids, an emerging therapeutic option for COVID-19 related urticaria. J Dermatolog Treat. 2020 Jul 10;:1-10 Authors: Shanshal M Abstract Dermatologists around the world are still doing their best to report more cutaneous manifestations of the emerging COVID-19 infection. New-onset acute or relapsing chronic urticaria may result from the body's overreacting inflammatory response to infection. The cytokine storm hits different organs in the body, including the skin, leading to activation and degranulation of mast cells with resultant urticaria. Low-dose systemic steroids combined with antihistamines can combat the COVID-19 inflammatory insult and play a role in the control of COVID-19 related severe urticarial attack. PMID: 32649228 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Dermatological Treatment - Category: Dermatology Tags: J Dermatolog Treat Source Type: research

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Abstract The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), the cause of coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) pandemic, is associated with some cutaneous manifestations. Although the cutaneous presentations of COVID-19 are infrequent, it is of great importance for all clinicians to be aware of these manifestations, as it may contribute to sooner and better diagnosis and management of the disease, even in asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic patients. The reported cutaneous manifestations of COVID-19 are various, dispersed, and sometimes confusing. In this article, all reported cases to date were collected and classified under 6 major...
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Biomed Res Int Source Type: research
Abstract: Skin manifestations of COVID-19 infections are diverse and are new to the dermatology community. We had the opportunity to examine the clinical and histopathological features of several patients who were divided into 3 groups. The first group included 8 COVID-19–positive patients who were hospitalized and quarantined at home. The second group included children and young adults who presented with chilblain erythema, erythema multiforme, and urticaria-like lesions. This group of patients was negative for the COVID-19 gene sequences by polymerase chain reaction but had a high risk of COVID-19 infection. The ...
Source: The American Journal of Dermatopathology - Category: Pathology Tags: Original Study Source Type: research
PMID: 32711028 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol Source Type: research
We describe a morbidly obese male smoker patient with severe refractory urticaria, angioedema and systemic symptoms requiring oral glucocorticoids who was subsequently diagnosed with COVID-19 and had a successful outcome.Patient was 36-year-old obese male who presented with a complaint of acute urticaria. He awoke (day 0) with generalized erythema and pruritus and the gradual onset of generalized urticaria (palms and soles included).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
The onset of severe urticaria has been linked to viral infections in both children and adults.1 Here, we describe a patient who is a morbidly obese man, smoker, with severe refractory urticaria, angioedema, and systemic symptoms requiring oral glucocorticoids, and who was subsequently diagnosed as having coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and had a successful outcome. The patient was a 36-year-old obese man who presented with a complaint of acute urticaria (Fig 1). He woke up (day 0) with generalized erythema and pruritus with gradual onset of generalized urticaria (palms and soles included).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
We report this consensus to support allergists and clinical immunologists to make optimal decisions under the urgent situation in Asia. PMID: 32638559 [PubMed]
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research
We present a patient with COVID-19 related anagen effluvium. The patient was treated with and responded to low dose systemic steroids to treat an accompanying extensive COVID-19-related urticaria and maculopapular rash. PMID: 32628051 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Dermatological Treatment - Category: Dermatology Tags: J Dermatolog Treat Source Type: research
Authors: GÜl Ü Abstract Sars-CoV-2 virus infection (COVID-19) was observed in China in the last months of 2019. In the following period, this infection spread all over the world. In March 2020, the World Health Organization announced the existence of a pandemic. The aim of this manuscript is to investigate skin diseases associated with COVID-19 under three main headings: Skin problems related to personal protective equipment and personal hygiene measures, skin findings observed in SARS-CoV-2 virus infection and finally skin findings due to COVID- 19 treatment agents. Pressure injury, contact dermatitis, i...
Source: Turkish Journal of Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Tags: Turk J Med Sci Source Type: research
Idiopathic nonhistaminergic acquired angioedema (InH-AAE) is a rare disease characterized by submucosal swelling without concomitant urticaria and poor response to antihistamines and corticosteroids.1 Compared with other forms of hereditary and acquired angioedema, InH-AAE seems to have a predilection for facial and tongue swelling, and is often difficult to diagnose as patients have normal laboratory values and no family history.1 To our knowledge, there have been no publications to date describing idiopathic nonhistaminergic angioedema as a complication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infe...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Idiopathic nonhistaminergic acquired angioedema (InH-AAE) is a rare disease characterized by submucosal swelling without concomitant urticaria and poor response to antihistamines and corticosteroids.1 Compared with other forms of hereditary and acquired angioedema, InH-AAE seems to have a predilection for facial and tongue swelling and is often difficult to diagnose because patients have normal laboratory values and no family history.1 To the best of our knowledge, there have been no publications to date describing idiopathic nonhistaminergic angioedema as a complication of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
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