Management of Severe Asthma During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Korea.

Management of Severe Asthma During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Korea. Allergy Asthma Immunol Res. 2020 Sep;12(5):897-901 Authors: Kim S, Jin HJ, Kim SR PMID: 32638569 [PubMed]
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 27 July 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Francisco Javier Ruano, Maria Luisa Somoza Álvarez, Elisa Haroun-Díaz, María Vázquez de la Torrem, Paula López González, Ana Prieto-Moreno, Isabel Torres Rojas, María Desamparados Cervera García, Diana Pérez Alzate, Natalia Blanca-López, Gabriela Canto Díez
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study describes the presenting characteristics of patients with asthma and COVID-19 in a US health care system, establishing an evidence base for risk evaluation and clinical care for asthma during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTelemedicine is a rapidly growing healthcare sector that can improve access to care for underserved populations and offer flexibility and convenience to patients and clinicians alike. However, uncertainty about insurance coverage and reimbursement policies for telemedicine has historically been a major barrier to adoption, especially among physicians in private practice (the majority of practicing allergists).Recent FindingsThe COVID-19 public health emergency has highlighted the importance of telehealth as a safe and effective healthcare delivery model, with governments and payers rapidly expandin...
Source: Current Allergy and Asthma Reports - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Many abrupt adjustments in the delivery of medical care became necessary due to the unexpected emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020. In order to ensure social distancing and the concomitant requirements for personal protective equipment, practitioners have had to make a myriad of adjustments in order to continue providing subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT). In many practices SCIT was stopped or administration intervals have been increased, while other practices have transitioned some patients to the sublingual administration route.(1)
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Perspective Source Type: research
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused high utilization of healthcare resources including hospitalization and intensive care unit treatment. There has been considerable interest in determining which clinical factors stratify patients into high or low risk for severe COVID-19 illness to aid with clinical decision making. Advanced age, cardiovascular disease and diabetes have been associated with increased COVID-19 severity1. Asthma appears to be under-represented as a COVID-19 comorbidity compared to its global prevalence of disease1,2.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
We report this consensus to support allergists and clinical immunologists to make optimal decisions under the urgent situation in Asia. PMID: 32638559 [PubMed]
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research
THURSDAY, July 2, 2020 -- The coronavirus pandemic makes planning for July 4th a challenge this year, especially if someone in the family has allergies or asthma, an allergy expert says. " This summer will see modifications in how people celebrate...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
SARS-CoV-2 has led to the COVID-19 global pandemic. Respiratory allergy and allergic asthma have not been identified as significant risk factors for COVID-19 despite their well-known association with more severe respiratory viral illnesses. Angiotensin-converting-enzyme 2 (ACE2) is the receptor for SARS-CoV-2 infections. Jackson et  al (p 203), in this Letter to the Editor, aimed to determine whether respiratory allergy, allergic asthma, and/or controlled allergen exposure were associated with reductions in ACE2 gene expression, hypothesizing that this could reduce risk of COVID-19.
Source: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: The Editors ’ Choice Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 27 June 2020Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Elisa Haroun-Díaz, María Vázquez de la Torre, Francisco Javier Ruano, Maria Luisa Somoza Álvarez, Diana Pérez Alzate, Paula López González, Ana Prieto-Moreno, Isabel Torres Rojas, María Desamparados Cervera García, Natalia Blanca-López, Gabriela Canto Díez
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are used as anti-inflammatory controller therapy given either alone or combination with long acting bronchodilators for persistent asthma . The present COVID-19 pandemic has inevitably focussed attention as to whether ICS might predispose to SARS-CoV-2 infection , especially in older ,male, obese, smokers with comorbidities including chronic lung disease who are prone to more severe COVID-19 infection and worse outcomes. In the later stage of COVID-19 infection there is an acute inflammatory cytokine cascade including interleukin 1-beta (IL1- β) , interleukin-6 (IL6) and tumour necrosis f...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Perspective Source Type: research
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