What Is the Prevalence of Measles Immunity among Pregnant Women?

Conclusion Approximately one of every four pregnant patients is serologically measles nonimmune, even among women with documented MMR vaccination or documented rubella immunity. These findings raise concerns that relying on vaccination history or rubella immune status may not be sufficient to assure protection from infection with measles. If further suggests that measles serology should be added to routine prenatal laboratory testing to identify nonimmune patients that may benefit from postpartum vaccination. Key Points [...] Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.Article in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  Full text
Source: American Journal of Perinatology - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: SMFM Fellowship Series Article Source Type: research

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New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today finds MMR, MMRV and MMR+V vaccines are effective and that they are not associated with increased risk of autism. Measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (also known as chickenpox) are infectious diseases caused by viruses. They are most common in children and young adults, and can lead to potentially fatal illnesses, disabilities and death. Measles remains one of the leading causes of childhood death around the globe. Rubella is also dangerous for pregnant women, as it can cause miscarriage or harm to unborn babies. The MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) is a combined...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - Category: Information Technology Authors: Source Type: news
Right now, many people are hoping for a vaccine to protect against the new coronavirus. While that’s still on the horizon, new research suggests that families who do vaccinate their children may not be following the recommended schedule. Vaccines are given on a schedule for a reason: to protect children from vaccine-preventable disease. Experts designed the schedule so that children get protection when they need it — and the doses are timed so the vaccine itself can have the best effect. When parents don’t follow the schedule, their children may not be protected. And yet, many parents do not follow the sc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
You’ve done it! You’ve taken that last birth control pill, removed your IUD, or stopped using your contraceptive method of choice. You’ve made the decision to try to conceive a pregnancy, and while this is an exciting time in your life, it can also feel overwhelming. There is so much advice around fertility and pregnancy, and sifting through it all just isn’t possible. For many mothers, their goals crystallize around ensuring that their baby is healthy. Evidence-based steps that may prevent birth defects January is Birth Defects Prevention Month, so we want to focus on things you can do to reduce th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Family Planning and Pregnancy Fertility Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Vaccinations before and during pregnancy are important to protect both mother and baby. Three vaccinations are recommended: flu, Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis), and MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella).
Source: TMA News Room - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(NEW YORK) — U.S. measles cases in 2019 have climbed to their highest level in 25 years in a resurgence largely attributed to misinformation that is turning parents against vaccines. New York City health officials on Wednesday reported 61 new cases since late last week, pushing this year’s nationwide tally past the 667 cases reported for all of 2014. That would make 2019 the worst year for measles since 1994. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updates its national measles count on Mondays. CDC officials said they are reviewing the latest reports. Roughly three-quarters of this year’s illnesses...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized measles onetime Source Type: news
On December 14, 2017, a school nurse notified the Johnson County Department of Health and Environment in Kansas that a student's pregnant mother had received a diagnosis of rubella.
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Tags: Children's Health Espa ├▒ol HIV/AIDS Hispanic health HIV Prevention HIV/AIDS and STDs Infection Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella (MMRV) Vaccine Safety MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Pregnancy Pseudomonas Vaccination Source Type: news
Doctors say that there is no scientific evidence suggesting a link between vaccines that infants and young children receive in the first few years of life and the risk of autism, but that has not stopped parents from questioning the connection — and in some cases, forgoing vaccinations for their kids. In the latest study published in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers led by Ousseny Zerbo, from the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, found that children diagnosed with autism are less likely to receive additional vaccines, and that their younger siblings are less likely to receive the full schedule of childhood vaccinat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime vaccines Source Type: news
Doctors say that there is no scientific evidence suggesting a link between vaccines that infants and young children receive in the first few years of life and the risk of autism, but that has not stopped parents from questioning the connection — and in some cases, forgoing vaccinations for their kids. In the latest study published in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers led by Ousseny Zerbo, from the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center, found that children diagnosed with autism are less likely to receive additional vaccines, and that their younger siblings are less likely to receive the full schedule of childhood vaccinat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime vaccines Source Type: news
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Source: Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Source Type: research
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