UN Chief Warns of Deadly Germs as Potential Bioterrorist Weapons

Credit: United NationsBy Thalif DeenUNITED NATIONS, Jul 8 2020 (IPS) The coronavirus—which has claimed the lives of over 538,000 people and infected more than 11.6 million worldwide—has destabilized virtually every facet of human life ever since its outbreak in late December. Providing a grim economic scenario of the devastation caused by the pandemic– including rising poverty, hunger and unemployment– UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned last week of the possibility of an even worse disaster: the risks of bioterrorist attacks deploying deadly germs. He said it has already shown some of the ways in which preparedness might fall short, “if a disease were to be deliberately manipulated to be more virulent, or intentionally released in multiple places at once”. “So, as we consider how to improve our response to future disease threats, we should also devote serious attention to preventing the deliberate use of diseases as weapons,” he declared, speaking at a Security Council meeting on the maintenance of international peace and security— and the implications of COVID-19. Guterres pointed out that the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC), which codifies “a strong and longstanding norm against the abhorrent use of disease as a weapon”, has 183 States Parties. “I urge the 14 States that have not yet joined the Convention to do so without any further delay,” he urged. Opened for signature on April 1...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Armed Conflicts Featured Global Global Geopolitics Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

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Teresa Joseph Thanks to a U.S. Department of Defense contract for as much as $9.5 million, the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix and partners aim to develop a portable device to easily and accurately detects biological threats, including the virus that causes COVID-19. Today College of Medicine – Phoenix2017.07.28 ANBM Lab Shoot-1854-web-web.jpg Researchers in the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine in the College of Medicine – Phoenix work to create devices and diagnostics focused on personalized medicine. The center is leading an effort to develop a device for easy, qu...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
It wasn’t greed, or curiosity, that made Li Rusheng grab his shotgun and enter Shitou Cave. It was about survival. During Mao-era collectivization of the early 1970s, food was so scarce in the emerald valleys of southwestern China’s Yunnan province that farmers like Li could expect to eat meat only once a year–if they were lucky. So, craving protein, Li and his friends would sneak into the cave to hunt the creatures they could hear squeaking and fluttering inside: bats. Li would creep into the gloom and fire blindly at the vaulted ceiling, picking up any quarry that fell to the ground, while his companion...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
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Source: Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Acta Microbiol Immunol Hung Source Type: research
On Oct. 24, 2019—45 days before the world’s first suspected case of COVID-19 was announced—a new “scorecard” was published called the Global Health Security Index. The scorecard ranked countries on how prepared they were to tackle a serious outbreak, based on a range of measures, including how quickly a country was likely to respond and how well its health care system would “treat the sick and protect health workers.” The U.S. was ranked first out of 195 nations, and the U.K. was ranked second. You read that correctly. The two countries that on paper were the best prepared to deal ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Abstract The COVID-19 outbreak is increasing around the world in the number of cases, deaths, and affected countries. Currently, the knowledge regarding the clinical impact of COVID-19 on maternal, fetal, and placental aspects of pregnancy is minimal. Although the elderly and men were the most affected population, in previous situations, such as the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and the Ebola epidemic, pregnant women were more likely to develop complications than nonpregnant women. There are unanswered questions speci fi c to pregnant women, such as whether pregnant women are more severely affected and whether intrauterine...
Source: Revista Brasileira de Ginecologia e Obstetricia - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news
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Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Plague Smallpox Ebola Virus Influenza Epidemic (1918-19) Rats Antibiotics Bubonic Plague Fleas Microbiology Deaths (Fatalities) Vaccination and Immunization your-feed-science your-feed-health Source Type: news
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Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Digital Health Health Workforce & Systems Source Type: news
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Physicians Anish Koka medical autonomy Pandemic Source Type: blogs
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Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
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