Additional diagnostic testing of the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2)

AbstractPurpose of reviewWithin the last two decades several members of the Coronaviridae family namely Severe Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) have demonstrated epidemic potential. In late, 2019 an unnamed genetic relative, later named SARS-CoV-2 realized its potential in the highly populous neighborhoods of Wuhan, China. Unchecked, the virus rapidly spread among interconnected communities and related households before containment measures could be in acted. “Appropriate” diagnostic testing in response to the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak should be urgently considered. This perspective review gives particular attention to the potential diagnostic testing of the virus in semen and seminal fluids due to its high levels of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) precursor.Recent findingsAs many infectious viruses are stable in semen and have transmitted the respective diseases, the presence of SARS-CoV-2 should be tested in semen to assess their stabilities and half-life. As in case of Ebola virus, it was present in semen for longer period in a carrier man without any symptom. Additional hypothesis is that since ACE2 could serve as a mediator for the endocytosis of the previously SARS coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 may enter the cells through similar mechanism. From the protein expression atlas, high levels of ACE2 precursor were found in intestines and testis. Hence, the testis and seminal fluids could be the host cell and/or reservoir....
Source: Molecular and Cellular Toxicology - Category: Cytology Source Type: research

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