COVID-19 and venous thromboembolism: current insights and prophylactic strategies.

COVID-19 and venous thromboembolism: current insights and prophylactic strategies. Ann Med. 2020 Jul 03;:1-13 Authors: Ambrosino P, Di Minno A, Maniscalco M, Di Minno MND Abstract The rapidly increasing number of studies on the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) indicate that this viral agent can cause the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a syndrome with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations, ranging from a mild disease with flu-like symptoms to a life-threatening condition that requires specialized management at Intensive Care Units (ICU). Critical patients with COVID-19 have a high risk of thromboembolic complications, as expressed by a Padua prediction score always ≥4. Moreover, a number of clinical factors may increase the risk of major bleedings in these patients during ICU stay. Overall, literature data suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection can rapidly develop into a severe condition with renal, pulmonary and hepatic complications, potentially increasing both thrombotic and haemorrhagic risk. Failure of prevention and interventional strategies for the haemostatic imbalance of severe COVID-19 patients may dramatically impact their prognosis. The role of thromboprophylaxis in this clinical setting is discussed. Key messagesSevere patients with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have a high risk of thromboembolic complications, as expressed by a Padua prediction score always ≥4.A number of clinical factors...
Source: Annals of Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Ann Med Source Type: research

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Covid-19 has significant implications of hematologic systems, including lymphocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, pulmonary thromboembolism, and myocardial infarction [1,2]. Iwasaki et al. reported that the pathogen of Covid-19, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), can induce immune dysfunction, inflammation, and antibody-dependent enhancement by activating host cells via the Fc γIIa receptor in the same way as SARS-CoV-1 [3].
Source: Thrombosis Research - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editors-in-Chief Source Type: research
Acute respiratory distress syndrome development in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia is associated with a high mortality rate and is the main cause of death in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection [1]. Myocardial injury has also been reported to be significantly associated with fatal outcome, with a 37% mortality rate in patients without prior cardiovascular disease but elevated troponin levels [2]. A D-dimer level of>1 μg·mL–1 has been clearly identified as a risk factor for poor outcome in SARS-Cov-2 infection [3], with rece...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Articles: Research letters Source Type: research
With the objective of linking early findings relating to the novel SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with potentially informative findings from prior research literature and to promote investigation toward therapeutic response, a coherent cellular and molecular pathway is proposed for COVID-19. The pathway is consistent with a broad range of observed clinical features and biological markers and captures key mediators of pathophysiology. In this proposed pathway, membrane fusion and cytoplasmic entry of SARS-CoV-2 virus via ACE2 and TMPRSS2-expressing respiratory epithelial cells, including pulmonary type-II pneumocytes, provoke an in...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Abstract Up to 20% of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) patients develop severe inflammatory complications with diffuse pulmonary inflammation, reflecting acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A similar clinical profile occurs in severe trauma cases. This review compares pathophysiological and therapeutic principles of severely injured trauma patients and severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The development of sequential organ failure in trauma parallels deterioration seen in severe COVID-19. Based on established pathophysiological models in the field of trauma, two compleme...
Source: Patient Safety in Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Patient Saf Surg Source Type: research
Here, we report a case of non ‐severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) complicated by pulmonary embolism (PE), which indicates that the possibility of PE should consistently be considered, even in non‐severe cases of COVID‐19 without any risk of thrombosis. AbstractNovel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID ‐19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is rapidly spreading worldwide. A typical clinical manifestation of COVID‐19 is pneumonia, which can progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome and respiratory failure. Recent studies have reported that COVID‐19 is often accom panied by coag...
Source: Respirology Case Reports - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Abstract The world is amid a pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2. Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus causes serious respiratory tract infections that can lead to viral pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and death. Some patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have an activated coagulation system characterized by elevated plasma levels of d-dimer-a biomarker of fibrin degradation. Importantly, high levels of D-dimer on hospital admission are associated with increased risk of mortality. Venous thromboembolism is more common than arterial thromboembolism...
Source: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol Source Type: research
AbstractThe novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and the resulting disease COVID-19 causes pulmonary failure including severe courses requiring venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (V-V ECMO). Coagulopathy is a known complication of COVID-19 leading to thrombotic events including pulmonary embolism. It is unclear if the coagulopathy also increases thrombotic circuit complications of the ECMO. Aim of the present study therefor was to investigate the rate of V-V ECMO complications in COVID-19. We conducted a retrospective registry study including all patients on V-V ECMO treated at our centre between 01/2018 and 04/2020. C...
Source: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Roberts S, Rogan C, Schul MW, Komlos P, Stirling A, Thibault S, Varghese R, Welch HJ, Wittens CH Abstract The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic has resulted in diversion of healthcare resources to the management of patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus. Elective interventions and surgical procedures in most countries have been postponed and operating room resources have been diverted to manage the pandemic. The Venous and Lymphatic Triage and Acuity Scale was developed to provide an international standard to rationalise and harmonise the management of patients with venous and lymphatic disorde...
Source: Phlebology - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Phlebology Source Type: research
AbstractAfter the emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the last two decades, the world is facing its new challenge in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic with unprecedented global response. With the expanding domain of presentations in COVID-19 patients, the full range of manifestations is yet to unfold. The classical clinical symptoms for SARS-CoV-2 affected patients are dry cough, high fever, dyspnoea, lethal pneumonia whereas many patients have also been found to be associated with a few addi...
Source: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has spread throughout the world after its emergence in Wuhan, China in December 2019. The disease is caused by a single-stranded RNA virus referred to as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2).
Source: Thrombosis Research - Category: Hematology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editors-in-Chief Source Type: research
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