The Pandemic ’s Big Mystery: How Deadly Is the Coronavirus?

Even with more than 500,000 dead worldwide, scientists are struggling to learn how often the virus kills. Here ’s why.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Influenza Epidemic (1918-19) Coronavirus Reopenings Deaths (Fatalities) Third World and Developing Countries Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Health Organization University of Minnesota Source Type: news

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By MICHEL ACCAD, MD With cases of COVID-19 either disappeared or rapidly diminishing from places like Wuhan, Italy, New York, and Sweden, many voices are speculating that herd immunity may have been reached in those areas and that it may be at hand in the remaining parts of the world that are still struggling with the pandemic.  Lockdowns should end—or may not have been needed to begin with, they conclude. Adding plausibility to their speculation is the discovery of biological evidence suggesting that prior exposure to other coronaviruses may confer some degree of immunity against SARS-CoV...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy immunity MICHEL ACCAD Pandemic Source Type: blogs
On Oct. 24, 2019—45 days before the world’s first suspected case of COVID-19 was announced—a new “scorecard” was published called the Global Health Security Index. The scorecard ranked countries on how prepared they were to tackle a serious outbreak, based on a range of measures, including how quickly a country was likely to respond and how well its health care system would “treat the sick and protect health workers.” The U.S. was ranked first out of 195 nations, and the U.K. was ranked second. You read that correctly. The two countries that on paper were the best prepared to deal ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Abstract The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is exacting a disproportionate toll on ethnic minority communities and magnifying existing disparities in health care access and treatment. To understand this crisis, physicians and public health researchers have searched history for insights, especially from a great outbreak approximately a century ago: the 1918 influenza pandemic. However, of the accounts examining the 1918 influenza pandemic and COVID-19, only a notable few discuss race. Yet, a rich, broader scholarship on race and epidemic disease as a "sampling device for social analysis" exi...
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
Convalescent plasma for the treatment of infectious diseases has been used since the early 20th century and was associated with reduced mortality during the 1918 influenza, 2003 SARS, and 2009 influenza H1N1 pandemics. However, most published studies of these diseases were case series and retrospective comparisons of treated and nontreated individuals. Consistent with this, several uncontrolled case series of convalescent plasma use in patients with coronavirus disease (2019) COVID-19 have suggested a possible benefit. Given encouraging historical precedents and the absence of proven SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory di...
Source: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract Oculo-centric factors may provide a key to understanding invasion success by SARS-CoV-2, a highly contagious, potentially lethal, virus with ocular tropism. Respiratory infection transmission via the eye and lacrimal-nasal pathway elucidated during the 1918 influenza pandemic, remains to be explored in this crisis. The eye and its adnexae represent a large surface area directly exposed to airborne viral particles and hand contact. The virus may bind to corneal and conjunctival angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors and potentially to the lipophilic periocular skin and superficial tear film with ...
Source: The Ocular Surface - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Ocul Surf Source Type: research
An infectious outbreak can conclude in more ways than one, historians say. But for whom does it end, and who gets to decide?
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Epidemics Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Plague Smallpox Ebola Virus Influenza Epidemic (1918-19) Rats Antibiotics Bubonic Plague Fleas Microbiology Deaths (Fatalities) Vaccination and Immunization your-feed-science your-feed-health Source Type: news
This article originally appeared on The Bulwark here. The post The False Choice Between Science And Economics appeared first on The Health Care Blog.
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy David Shaywitz Source Type: blogs
A community approach of ‘search, treat and prevent’ was crucial to stopping the spread of tuberculosis in the developed worldThere were three great pandemics in the 20th century. The influenza pandemic of 1918 and the HIV pandemic during the 1980s and 1990s get the most attention. But the third, tuberculosis, was the deadliest by far and in many communities, it ’s not yet over.TB has much to teach us about the tools that can help to eradicate the current pandemic, and what happens when those tools aren ’t even tried. The disease killed more thanone billion people between 1800 and 2000. Although it i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases World news Tuberculosis Health Medical research Microbiology Science Society Drugs Antibiotics US news Source Type: news
Calls planned despite No 10 saying PM not working while he recovers from coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBoris Johnson has spoken to Donald Trump and will have a telephone audience with the Queen this week, even though No 10 continues to insist he is not doing any government work while he recovers from coronavirus at Chequers.Epidemics of infectious diseases behave in different ways but the 1918 influenza pandemic that killed more than 50 million people is regarded as a key example of a pandemic that occurred in multiple waves, with the latter more severe than the firs...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Boris Johnson Coronavirus outbreak UK news Infectious diseases World news Science Politics Donald Trump The Queen Source Type: news
PM will have telephone audience with the Queen while he recovers from coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBoris Johnson has spoken to Donald Trump and will have a telephone audience with the Queen this week, even though No 10 continues to insist he is not doing any government work while he recovers from coronavirus at Chequers.Epidemics of infectious diseases behave in different ways but the 1918 influenza pandemic that killed more than 50 million people is regarded as a key example of a pandemic that occurred in multiple waves, with the latter more severe than the first. ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Boris Johnson Coronavirus outbreak UK news Infectious diseases World news Science Politics Donald Trump The Queen Source Type: news
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