Asthma, Allergies Plus Pandemic May Pose 4th of July Challenges

THURSDAY, July 2, 2020 -- The coronavirus pandemic makes planning for July 4th a challenge this year, especially if someone in the family has allergies or asthma, an allergy expert says. " This summer will see modifications in how people celebrate...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

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The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused high utilization of health care resources, including hospitalization and intensive care unit treatment. There has been considerable interest in determining which clinical factors stratify patients into high or low risk for severe COVID-19 illness to aid with clinical decision making. Advanced age, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes have been associated with increased COVID-19 severity.1 Asthma seems to be underrepresented as a COVID-19 comorbidity compared with the global prevalence of the disease.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
We report this consensus to support allergists and clinical immunologists to make optimal decisions under the urgent situation in Asia. PMID: 32638559 [PubMed]
Source: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Allergy Asthma Immunol Res Source Type: research
Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are used as anti-inflammatory controller therapy given either alone or in a combination with long-acting bronchodilators for persistent asthma. The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has inevitably focused attention on whether ICS could predispose to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, especially in older, male, obese, smokers with comorbidities including chronic lung diseases who are susceptible to severe COVID-19 infection and worse outcomes.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Perspective Source Type: research
The use of telemedicine dates as far back as 50 years ago, when the University of Nebraska used interactive telemedicine to transmit neurologic examinations.1 Since that time, despite advances in available technologies, and proven utility of telemedicine in allergy/immunology (AI),2,3 the uptake of telemedicine by AI physicians remains low.4 With the global spread of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), AI physicians were abruptly forced to change their mode of health care delivery. Given the need for social distancing and exposure mitigation, many practices quickly adapted to remote encounters from primarily in-person care.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
The use of telemedicine dates as far back as 50 years ago, when the University of Nebraska used interactive telemedicine to transmit neurologic examinations.1 Since that time, despite advances in available technologies and proven utility of telemedicine in allergy and immunology (AI),2,3 the use of telemedicine by AI physicians remains low.4 With the global spread of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), AI physicians were abruptly forced to change their mode of health care delivery. Given the need for social distancing and exposure mitigation, many practices quickly adapted to remote encounters from primarily in-person care.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Before the ravaging appearance of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, influenza viruses have been among the major players in the history of health disasters over the past century.1,2 Because the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic claimed more than 50 million lives followed by annual resurgence of varying degrees of morbidity and mortality, the influenza vaccine program has driven platform development and global collaborative surveillance networks. These networks support the definition of antigenic shifts that drive annual vaccine specificities for manufacturing responses.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Nearly a year ago, the editors at the Annals of Allergy, Asthma&Immunology decided to put together an issue focused on vaccine technology and the importance of vaccination. At that time, we thought it was best to focus on respiratory virus vaccines (specifically for influenza and respiratory syncytial virus [RSV]), issues related to developing vaccines, and the distressing social movement against vaccination. Coronaviruses were not even considered. Now, we find ourselves in the middle of a pandemic created by a novel coronavirus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), with a rush to develop...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
ConclusionDuring COVID-19 pandemic, allergists have the responsibility of balancing individual patients ’ needs with public health issues, and innovative tools, such as telemedicine and digital medicine services, can be helpful to reduce the risk of viral spreading while delivering up-to-date personalized care.
Source: Clinical and Translational Allergy - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Several aspects of the coronavirus pandemic, such as changes in daily schedules, physical activity and telemedicine, could affect how children manage their asthma right now, according to a new report.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory syndrome that emerged in the city of Wuhan and rapidly spread throughout the world causing a global pandemic.1 The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been identified as its causal agent.1 Factors such as older age or presence of comorbidities are frequently identified as variables with a negative effect on patients ’ prognosis.2 If we focus on the preexistent respiratory conditions, a higher risk of developing a severe infection has been reported in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
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