Sustainable Tourism and Fisheries Key to Growth in Post-COVID Pacific

A boat rests on the shores of Fiji. Credit: Unsplash / Nicolas WeldinghBy Armida Salsiah AlisjahbanaBANGKOK, Thailand, Jun 30 2020 (IPS) Developing countries of Asia and the Pacific are experiencing unbalanced tolls of the COVID-19 pandemic. Grim milestones in infections and deaths have left countless devastated. Yet, we must look at the economic and social impacts in small island developing States (SIDS), where setbacks are likely to undo years of development gains and push many people back into poverty. Compared to other developing countries, SIDS in the Asia-Pacific region have done well in containing the spread of the virus. So far, available data indicates relatively few cases of infections, with 15 deaths in total in Maldives, Guam and Northern Mariana Islands. Yet while rapid border closures have contained the human cost of the virus, the economic and social impacts of the pandemic on SIDS will place the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) even farther out of their reach. This is worrying as SIDS in Asia and the Pacific were only on track to reach SDG 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure and SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production and as they had in fact regressed in SDG 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth, a crucial driver of inclusive development and key to reaching all SDGs. One reason SIDS’ economies are severely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic is their dependence on tourism. Tourism earnings exceed 50 per cent of GDP in Maldives and Palau and...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

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Yasmine Sherif, Director of Education Cannot WaitBy Yasmine SherifNEW YORK, Oct 9 2020 (IPS) Out of global crises spring opportunities for change. In crisis, change is not an option. It is a necessity. And, as Plato famously noted: “Necessity is the mother of invention.” Education Cannot Wait (ECW) is an invention that sprang out of crisis and was borne of necessity. Yasmine SherifEducation Cannot Wait was conceived as a direct response to the lack of financial resources and crisis-sensitive approaches needed to address the learning crisis for 75 million vulnerable children and adolescents impacted by armed co...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Armed Conflicts Climate Change Economy & Trade Education Education Cannot Wait. Future of Education is here Financial Crisis Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Poverty & SDGs TerraV Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of reviewTo elucidate the intertwining of vascular events, vascular disease and vascular risk factors and COVID-19.Recent findingsStrokes are a leading cause of disability and death worldwide. Vascular risk factors are important drivers of strokes. There are unmodifiable vascular risk factors such as age and ethnicity and modifiable vascular risk factors. According to the INTERSTROKE study, the 10 most frequent modifiable vascular risk factors are arterial hypertension, physical inactivity, overweight, dyslipidaemia, smoking, unhealthy diet, cardiac pathologies, diabetes mellitus, stress/depression and over...
Source: Current Treatment Options in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Robyn Powell (Stetson University), Applying the Health Justice Framework to Address Health and Health Care Inequities Experienced by People with Disabilities During and After COVID-19, Wash. L. Rev. (2020, Forthcoming): The COVID-19 pandemic has been especially devastating for people with...
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - Category: Medical Law Authors: Source Type: blogs
IPC and multiple sport organisations have partnered with United Through Sports to launch 2020 World Virtual Youth Festival to get youngsters around the world active during COVID-19 pandemic
Source: Disabled World - Category: Disability Tags: Disability Sports News Source Type: news
COVID-19 has shown there is an urgent need for government to ensure that councils and local partners have the necessary funding to enable timely and effective home adaptations for older and disabled people, to help ensure their safety, wellbeing and independence during and beyond the pandemic.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
As voiced by the late Congressman John Lewis, “The vote is the most powerful nonviolent tool we have to make change in a democratic society.” For health care professionals, it is also a powerful tool for helping our patients and their families make change in their communities. Together, we must empower our colleagues and patients to vote. Voting and health are inherently linked, as discussed by Gordon in his 2016 Academic Medicine article, “How Can Physicians Educate Patients About Health Care Policy Issues?” In this article, Gordon notes how voting is our primary means of selecting the governmen...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Featured Guest Perspective health equity patients voter moblization Source Type: blogs
This October is the 10th anniversary of the Equality Act in Great Britain, and COVID-19 has shown why it is still so needed. As a UNISON activist in a voluntary sector branch, I rely on the Equality Act when representing members – including disabled members discriminated against and facing dismissal because of sickness levels, lack of disability leave or reasonable adjustments. I have also used it to prevent discrimination happening in the first place, working with employers to introduce accessibility passports for disabled workers. The Equality Act was a fantastic achievement. Years of trade union campaigning and a ...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - Category: Food Science Authors: Tags: Article News Covid-19 equalities equality act Source Type: news
Just like every emergency, Covid-19 is racist, ageist, classist and sexist. The world response to the pandemic must reflect thisIn the early days of coronavirus, there was a view that a global pandemic would act as a great equaliser. “A virus doesn’t discriminate,” they said. “We’re all in this together.” It didn’t take long for such a credulous perspective to vanish.Just like every emergency, every disaster, Covid-19 absolutely does discriminate. It ’s ageist, it’s racist, it’s classist and it’s worst of all for those with pre-existing health conditions or ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Women's rights and gender equality Global development Coronavirus outbreak World news Life and style Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news
The objective of our study was to report the frequency of AEs that occurred during the months when SARS-CoV-2 spreading rate was at its highest in the Italian NHs and to identify which conditions and attributes were most associated with the occurrence of AEs by means of multivariate regression logistic analysis. Data are referred to 1,356 NHs that participated in the survey. The overall response rate was 41.2% over a time-period of six weeks (from March 24 to May 5). About one third of the facilities (444 out of 1,334) (33.3%) reported at least 1 adverse event, with a total of 2,000 events. Among the included NHs, having a...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
This article examines key concerns and challenges affecting the health care of this community during the pandemic.American Journal of Public Health
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news
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