We Have a Cheap, Effective Way to Keep Ourselves Safer From COVID-19. Why Are We Fighting About It?

At long last, we have made a truly game-changing scientific breakthrough in preventing the spread of COVID-19. The impact of this breakthrough seems almost too good to be true. We have found a disease control tool that, when used properly, can dramatically reduce the person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Studies have shown that this tool could reduce transmission by somewhere between 50% and 85%. The tool is cheap and remarkably low-tech. You can even make one at home. It has no significant side effects. And with each passing day, the scientific research showing the tool’s effectiveness gets stronger and stronger. If this tool were a vaccine or medicine, we’d be high-fiving each other and popping the champagne, knowing we’d discovered a crucial means to help prevent the spread of the pandemic. I’m talking, of course, about face masks—cloth, surgical, or even a bandanna. Face masks block the spread of respiratory droplets that can carry the novel coronavirus. But just as with so many other aspects of the response to COVID-19—including mass testing, contact tracing, and the early use of stay-at-home orders—the U.S. is once again squandering this opportunity. In many countries that have so far successfully controlled their COVID-19 epidemics, public health leaders, politicians, and the public have fully embraced the use of face masks with no hint of controversy. A recent study found that countries...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Journal of Hazardous MaterialsAuthor(s): Yubo Cheng, Yiqiu Ma, Biao Dong, Xinghua Qiu, Di Hu
Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: American Journal of Kidney DiseasesAuthor(s): Shreeram Akilesh, Cynthia C. Nast, Michifumi Yamashita, Kammi Henriksen, Vivek Charu, Megan L. Troxell, Neeraja Kambham, Erika Bracamonte, Donald Houghton, Naila I. Ahmed, Chyi Chyi Chong, Bijin Thajudeen, Shehzad Rehman, Firas Khoury, Jonathan E. Zuckerman, Jeremy Gitomer, Parthassarathy C. Raguram, Shanza Mujeeb, Ulrike Schwarze, M. Brendan Shannon
Source: American Journal of Kidney Diseases - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2020Source: Reumatología Clínica (English Edition)Author(s): Lina María Saldarriaga Rivera, Daniel Fernández Ávila, Wilson Bautista Molano, Daniel Jaramillo Arroyave, Alain Jasaf Bautista Ramírez, Adriana Díaz Maldonado, Jorge Hernán Izquierdo, Edwin Jáuregui, María Constanza Latorre Muñoz, Juan Pablo Restrepo, Juan Sebastián Segura Charry
Source: Reumatologia Clinica - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This single practice study showed total patient contact was similar over both sample periods, but most contact in 2020 was virtual. Further longitudinal multi-practice studies to confirm these findings and describe future consultation patterns are needed to inform general practice service delivery post-COVID-19. PMID: 33032304 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2020Source: Academic RadiologyAuthor(s): Neo Poyiadji, Chad Klochko, Jeff LaForce, Manuel L. Brown, Brent Griffith
Source: Academic Radiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
Curious what people think with pandemic and lack of away rotations.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Radiation Oncology Source Type: forums
By MICHEL ACCAD, MD With cases of COVID-19 either disappeared or rapidly diminishing from places like Wuhan, Italy, New York, and Sweden, many voices are speculating that herd immunity may have been reached in those areas and that it may be at hand in the remaining parts of the world that are still struggling with the pandemic.  Lockdowns should end—or may not have been needed to begin with, they conclude. Adding plausibility to their speculation is the discovery of biological evidence suggesting that prior exposure to other coronaviruses may confer some degree of immunity against SARS-CoV...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy immunity MICHEL ACCAD Pandemic Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The story of COVID-19 contact tracing is still in progress, and it’s not clear whether the ending will be success or failure. We hope that this essay has added depth to the opening words “Contact tracing for COVID-19 will be the most complex health investigation ever”. Vince Kuraitis, JD/MBA (@VinceKuraitis) is an independent healthcare strategy consultant with over 30 years’ experience across 150+ healthcare organizations. He blogs at e-CareManagement.com. Eric D. Perakslis, PhD (@eperakslis) is a Rubenstein Fellow at Duke University. Deven McGraw , JD, MPH, LLM (@h...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy The Health Data Goldilocks Dilemma: Sharing? Privacy? Both? Deven McGraw Eric Perakslis Vince Kuraitis Source Type: blogs
This article originally appeared on The Bulwark here. The post The False Choice Between Science And Economics appeared first on The Health Care Blog.
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy David Shaywitz Source Type: blogs
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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