We Have a Cheap, Effective Way to Keep Ourselves Safer From COVID-19. Why Are We Fighting About It?

At long last, we have made a truly game-changing scientific breakthrough in preventing the spread of COVID-19. The impact of this breakthrough seems almost too good to be true. We have found a disease control tool that, when used properly, can dramatically reduce the person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Studies have shown that this tool could reduce transmission by somewhere between 50% and 85%. The tool is cheap and remarkably low-tech. You can even make one at home. It has no significant side effects. And with each passing day, the scientific research showing the tool’s effectiveness gets stronger and stronger. If this tool were a vaccine or medicine, we’d be high-fiving each other and popping the champagne, knowing we’d discovered a crucial means to help prevent the spread of the pandemic. I’m talking, of course, about face masks—cloth, surgical, or even a bandanna. Face masks block the spread of respiratory droplets that can carry the novel coronavirus. But just as with so many other aspects of the response to COVID-19—including mass testing, contact tracing, and the early use of stay-at-home orders—the U.S. is once again squandering this opportunity. In many countries that have so far successfully controlled their COVID-19 epidemics, public health leaders, politicians, and the public have fully embraced the use of face masks with no hint of controversy. A recent study found that countries...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Publication date: October 2020Source: Current Opinion in Virology, Volume 44Author(s): Camila R Fontes-Garfias, Coleman K Baker, Pei-Yong Shi
Source: Current Opinion in Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 30 June 2020Source: Advances in Virus ResearchAuthor(s): Zhiqian Ma, Zhiwei Li, Linfang Dong, Ting Yang, Shuqi Xiao
Source: Advances in Virus Research - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Authors: Ma X, Wang L, Liu L, Yang C, Gai Z Abstract During the COVID-19 outbreak, asthma was very rare in China, and there were significant differences from previous clinical perceptions and the data from American, and we analyzed the possible causes. PMID: 32600166 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Asthma - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Asthma Source Type: research
Conclusions: Outdoor PM10 and O3 exposure was associated with reduction in FEV1 in atopic asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. PMID: 32597339 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Asthma - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Asthma Source Type: research
Authors: Faux SG, Eagar K, Cameron ID, Poulos CJ PMID: 32602124 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medical Journal of Australia - Category: General Medicine Tags: Med J Aust Source Type: research
Authors: Eisen D PMID: 32596817 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medical Journal of Australia - Category: General Medicine Tags: Med J Aust Source Type: research
Authors: Koczwara B PMID: 32596806 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medical Journal of Australia - Category: General Medicine Tags: Med J Aust Source Type: research
Conclusion The story of COVID-19 contact tracing is still in progress, and it’s not clear whether the ending will be success or failure. We hope that this essay has added depth to the opening words “Contact tracing for COVID-19 will be the most complex health investigation ever”. Vince Kuraitis, JD/MBA (@VinceKuraitis) is an independent healthcare strategy consultant with over 30 years’ experience across 150+ healthcare organizations. He blogs at e-CareManagement.com. Eric D. Perakslis, PhD (@eperakslis) is a Rubenstein Fellow at Duke University. Deven McGraw , JD, MPH, LLM (@h...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy The Health Data Goldilocks Dilemma: Sharing? Privacy? Both? Deven McGraw Eric Perakslis Vince Kuraitis Source Type: blogs
This article originally appeared on The Bulwark here. The post The False Choice Between Science And Economics appeared first on The Health Care Blog.
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy David Shaywitz Source Type: blogs
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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