Birthday Party Leaves 18 in Texas Family With Coronavirus

(CARROLLTON, Texas) — A surprise birthday party that resulted in 18 people testing positive for the coronavirus has left a North Texas man horrified as his father continues to fight for his life in a hospital intensive care unit. Ron Barbosa, who is married to a doctor and refused to attend the May 30 party for his daughter-in-law because of safety concerns amid the COVID-19 pandemic, said those hospitalized included his parents, both in their 80′s, and his sister, who is also battling breast cancer. Barbosa said his nephew, unknowingly infected with the virus, hosted last month’s gathering of 25 people that only lasted a few hours. During the party, he said the nephew interacted with seven relatives, who subsequently contracted the virus and spread it to 10 other family members, including two young children. Read more: America Is Done With COVID-19. COVID-19 Isn’t Done With America “When people started getting sick, we really let everyone have it,” Barbosa told WFAA-TV. “We knew this was going to happen, I mean, this whole time this has been going on we’ve been terrified.” Gov. Greg Abbott on Thursday said Texas would halt its aggressive reopening as it deals with a surge in coronavirus cases and hospitalizations that has made the state a virus hot spot. Statewide, the number of COVID-19 patients has more than doubled in two weeks. Texas has reported more than 11,000 new cases in the previous two days alone. Barbosa&rsqu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk Texas wire Source Type: news

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Liz Satterfield has a ritual for every time she returns home after leaving the house. Diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2016, the Kirkland, Washington resident recently learned that the cancer that had spread to her brain in 2018 was still growing. Throughout the pandemic, she’s had to visit the hospital at least once every three weeks, often more frequently, for treatments to control her disease. “I have a pair of shoes in a paper bag that I keep in the trunk of my car or a rack in the garage. I only wear those shoes when I’m going in to get treatment,” she says. “When I come home, I...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
ConclusionsMedical practice in limited resource settings has become a critical topic especially after the global crisis of COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding the resources necessary to provide oncofertility treatments is important until the current COVID-19 pandemic resolves. Lessons learned will be valuable to future potential worldwide disruptions due to infectious diseases or other global crises.
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Authors: Vidya R, Rubio IT, Paulinelli RR, Rancati A, Kolacinska-Voytkuv A, Salgarello M, Becker H Abstract The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the face of the treatment of breast cancer and breast reconstruction globally. Mastectomy with immediate implant-based breast reconstruction was on the rise due to advances in meshes and implants. However, due to the prioritisation of the critically ill and diversion of the work force, breast cancer treatment has drastically changed. This is an opinion paper written by the authors with experience and importance in the scenario of breast reconstructive surgery. Th...
Source: Ecancermedicalscience - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Ecancermedicalscience Source Type: research
It’s been 18 months since I finished chemo for breast cancer, 15 months since I finished radiation at this writing, June 2020. My hair grew back a year ago. The tingling in my fingers is gone. I used to have heart flutters and some chest congestion; those symptoms have passed.   I had a mammogram recently; it was good. No “signs of malignancy.” That’s how the official language goes. I wasn’t expecting anything bad, but you never know. I saw my oncologist the following week. She felt my scar tissue. I have tenderness under my armpit where four lymph nodes were removed. She said it al...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Personal Cancer coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic social distancing Source Type: blogs
BOSTON (CBS) – A top White House official was in Boston Friday to get a closer look at the coronavirus response in Massachusetts. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar visited the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center with Governor Charlie Baker to tour the hospital’s COVID-19 test kit assembly areas and learn more about the research there. “There is no better place in this country to come learn about what’s going on with respect to COVID, with respect to treatments, with respect to testing, with respective vaccines, with respect to care, than right here and we really appreciate your being wi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Events Health Healthcare Status Politics Syndicated Local Alex Azar Beth Israel Deacones Medical Center Charlie Baker Coronavirus Source Type: news
Conclusion: COVID-19-related anxiety could affect patients' decision-making process.
Source: In Vivo - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Clinical Studies Source Type: research
As the death tolls rise to the coronavirus pandemic, those of us who specialize in oncology are bracing for another wave of victims: People not yet diagnosed with cancer.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Tests (Medical) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Breast Cancer Doctors Leukemia Emergency Medical Treatment Hospitals Mammography Colonoscopy Source Type: news
Among the many remarkable things that have happened since the COVID-19 pandemic began is that a lot of our usual medical care has simply stopped. According to a recent study, routine testing for cervical cancer, cholesterol, and blood sugar is down nearly 70% across the country. Elective surgeries, routine physical examinations, and other screening tests have been canceled or rescheduled so that people can stay at home, avoid being around others who might be sick, and avoid unknowingly spreading the virus. Many clinics, hospitals, and doctors’ offices have been closed for weeks except for emergencies. Even if these f...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Health care Healthy Aging Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
The Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) released reopening recommendations on May...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Who gets breast cancer treatment during a pandemic? SBI releases coronavirus social distancing tips SBI cancels April symposium due to coronavirus Breast imagers cite high rates of burnout Radiologists mixed about synthesized 2D mammography
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Getting the news that you have cancer is overwhelming and frightening. The COVID-19 crisis adds another layer of anxiety. But know this: you can protect yourself from COVID-19 without compromising your cancer treatment. Don’t panic. In the vast majority of cases, a diagnosis of cancer is not an emergency even though it feels like one. There is time to learn about your options and sort out what is right for you. For now, there will be changes to how we do things. Some of the changes will feel disruptive, but many will lead to better, more patient-centered care. Minimizing your chances of exposure to the virus doesn&rs...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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