South Africa: Dramatic Drop in Immunisation Rates

[spotlight] National immunisation rates for children under five years have dropped dramatically over the period of South Africa's COVID-19 lockdown, sparking fears of an outbreak of deadly childhood infectious diseases including measles.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news

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The COVID-19 pandemic has had a worldwide effect for what seems like an eternity. After shelter-in-place orders became more prevalent in March,  most people probably didn’t think they’d still be wearing masks in October. So the question remains, when will the pandemic end?  It turns out there are quite a few factors that contribute to the rise and fall of a pandemic, some within our control, some that are not. An outbreak becomes a pandemic when it meets two criteria, first, it spreads rapidly and widely, and second, it must qualify as a severe disease. If either of these factors change, it is no long...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Coronavirus COVID COVID-19 COVID-19 Feature Source Type: blogs
Many nations lack access to affordable testing. Now 120m antigen tests will help tackle this dangerous inequalityCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe principles of managing infectious disease outbreaks, whether of measles, tuberculosis or Covid-19, are similar. You identify who has been infected by testing for the disease, discover where they acquired the infection and who may have also been infected through contact tracing, and stop the spread by asking those affected to isolate. People who become infected are treated with therapies that modify the course of the disease.It sounds simple, d...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news World Health Organization Source Type: news
Many months into the COVID-19 pandemic, the coronavirus is still spreading uncontrolled through the U.S. Public health authorities including the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) tell us to remain six feet apart, wash our hands, disinfect frequently touched surfaces, and wear masks. But compliance with these measures—especially masks—is mixed, and daily we hear of cases where people do not know how they were infected. We hear about superspreading events, where one person infects many, happening in crowded bars and family gatherings, but not at outdoor ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
President blamed ‘deep state or whoever’ for slow progressFormer FDA head hits back after chief of staff repeats claimAfter expressing frustration at the slow pace of approval for coronavirus treatments, and causing controversy by publicly linking the Food and Drug Administration to the “deep state” conspiracy theory, Donald Trump on Sunday announced the emergency authorization ofconvalescent plasma, a method which has been used to treat flu and measles, for Covid-19 patients.Related:'The haves and the have-nots': how Covid revealed Florida's wealth gapContinue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science Medical research World news US politics US news Donald Trump Trump administration US domestic policy Source Type: news
As some youth sports teams get started again, some summer camps and daycares are opening up, and we begin to think about school (or some form of it) in the fall, many parents are wondering: what do I do about getting that physical form I need for my child? Understandably, many families do not want to go to the doctor right now. They are worried about going anywhere, and especially worried about going to a medical office, where they are concerned they may end up around sick people. I want to say up front that most medical facilities are very aware of the risk, and take measures to make sure that patients can safely get the ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsCOVID-19 has become an everyday topic of discussion throughout the world, indicating the increasing number of COVID-19 cases, deaths and recoveries. The lessons learned from past pandemics such as social distancing, wearing masks, avoiding public gatherings and adherence to guidelines, along with personal hygiene, are the key measures that must be taken in order to live with COVID-19. Precautions for the elderly and pregnant women advised by medical authorities are to be strictly adhered to. These will help in reducing COVID-19 cases and in turn will reduce the pressure on hospitals to serve those in need. India...
Source: Journal of Public Health - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
By MICHEL ACCAD, MD With cases of COVID-19 either disappeared or rapidly diminishing from places like Wuhan, Italy, New York, and Sweden, many voices are speculating that herd immunity may have been reached in those areas and that it may be at hand in the remaining parts of the world that are still struggling with the pandemic.  Lockdowns should end—or may not have been needed to begin with, they conclude. Adding plausibility to their speculation is the discovery of biological evidence suggesting that prior exposure to other coronaviruses may confer some degree of immunity against SARS-CoV...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy immunity MICHEL ACCAD Pandemic Source Type: blogs
Moderna Therapeutics and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) announced today that researchers had injected the first volunteer in the first U.S. coronavirus vaccine to reach the final, phase 3 stage of testing. That person received the shot at 6:45 am eastern time in Savannah, Geo., Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) told reporters during a briefing. Because the trial will randomly assign participants to receive either the vaccine or a placebo, and neither the researchers nor the volunteers will kn...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
  The effect of coronavirus on the economy and our daily lives has been huge. COVID-19 has rightly dominated government and organization policies, social life, and media headlines so far this year – but are other diseases getting the right attention? Neglected diseases The World Health Organization maintains a department dedicated to the research and treatment of Neglected Tropical Diseases. These conditions are considered “neglected” by mainstream Medicine by virtue of a relative lack of impact and presence in Western countries. In January 2020, GIDEON listed 360 generic infectious diseases in huma...
Source: GIDEON blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: News Source Type: blogs
Pediatrics in a Pandemic: Q&A with Dr. Gary Kirkilas Andrea Kelly A College of Medicine – Phoenix pediatrician shares his observations about the impact of COVID-19 and encourages parents to use facts for health decisions. Tuesday University of Arizona Health Sciencessunglasses-1284419_1920.jpg Gary Kirkilas, a pediatrician at the UArizona College of Medicine – Phoenix, predicts that child drownings will increase this summer amid the pandemic. More children stuck at home means more exposure to swimming pools, particularly inflatable ones, he says.HealthCollege of Medicine - PhoenixCOVID-19Media contact: Ger...
Source: The University of Arizona: Health - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Source Type: research
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