IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 4477: Using Mind –Body Modalities via Telemedicine during the COVID-19 Crisis: Cases in the Republic of Korea

IJERPH, Vol. 17, Pages 4477: Using Mind–Body Modalities via Telemedicine during the COVID-19 Crisis: Cases in the Republic of Korea International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health doi: 10.3390/ijerph17124477 Authors: Chan-Young Kwon Hui-Yong Kwak Jong Woo Kim The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected the world, and its deleterious effects on human domestic life, society, economics, and especially on human mental health are expected to continue. Mental health experts highlighted health issues this pandemic may cause, such as depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Mind–body intervention, such as mindfulness meditation, has accumulated sufficient empirical evidence supporting the efficacy in improving human mental health states and the use for this purpose has been increasing. Notably, some of these interventions have already been tried in the form of telemedicine or eHealth. Korea, located adjacent to China, was exposed to COVID-19 from a relatively early stage, and today it is evaluated to have been successful in controlling this disease. “The COVID-19 telemedicine center of Korean medicine” has treated more than 20% of the confirmed COVID-19 patients in Korea with telemedicine since 9 March 2020. The center used telemedicine and mind–body modalities (including mindfulness meditation) to improve the mental health of patients diagnosed wit...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research

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