Eczema herpeticum emerging during atopic dermatitis in infancy.

CONCLUSION: All patients were misdiagnosed as AD exacerbation. Therefore, EH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of AD exacerbation especially in the infants with moderate to severe AD. PMID: 32558432 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The Turkish Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Turk J Pediatr Source Type: research

Related Links:

Discussion There are 8 common foods which compromise 90% of food allergens with those being peanuts, soybeans, cow’s milk, eggs, fish, crustacean/shellfish, wheat and tree nuts. Some people believe that lupin (a legume) is 9th. Legumes belong to the Fabaceae family. They provide protein, fat, vitamins other essential nutrients and therefore are used in the human diet throughout the world. “[A]llergenicity due to consumption of legumes in decreasing order may be peanut, soybean, lentil, chickpea, pea, mung bean and red gram.” Other common legumes include alfalfa, clovers, beans, lupins, mesquite, carob...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
Abstract The Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM, 0-28 points) is a self-assessed, repeatable measurement tool for measuring atopic dermatitis (AD) severity. How-ever, whether POEM score is influenced by allergic comorbidities and whether POEM's severity banding is applicable in web-based surveys for AD remain unclear. A web-based questionnaire survey was conducted in 329 patients with AD. POEM, self-reported severity of AD, and comorbidity of allergic diseases including asthma, pollen rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and food allergy were assessed. POEM scores were not affected by a history of comorbid allerg...
Source: Acta Dermato-Venereologica - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Acta Derm Venereol Source Type: research
Date: June 15, 2020 Issue #:  1600Summary:  Atopic dermatitis (AD; also known as eczema) is frequently associated with other atopic disorders such as allergic rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. It commonly presents in infancy and early childhood and has a relapsing course, often improving by adolescence, but sometimes persisting into (or first appearing in) adulthood or even old age.
Source: The Medical Letter - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: abrocitinib Alclometasone Amcinonide ApexiCon apremilast Atopic dermatitis Azasan Azathioprine baricitinib Betamethasone Clobetasol Clobex Clocortolone Cloderm Cordran corticosteroids crisaborole Cutivate Cyclosporine Source Type: research
ConclusionsSimilar to peanut allergy, eczema was strongly associated with egg allergy development and the association increased with increasing eczema severity. The age of introduction of dietary egg was not a risk factor. The potential role of antibiotics in early life as a risk factor for egg allergy needs further examination.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Allergic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD), food allergy (FA), asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR) are common; according to a national birth cohort study in Japan, almost half of pregnant women reported a history of allergic disease.1 Given that genetic factors, including family history, are predictors of allergic diseases in offspring, we expect the birth of many infants who carry a high risk of developing allergies. Among allergy prevention strategies, the effectiveness of primary prevention of eczema in high-risk infants by the topical application of emollient during the neonatal period has been demonstrated in two ...
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Allergic diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, food allergy, asthma, and allergic rhinitis, are common; according to a national birth cohort study in Japan, almost half of pregnant women reported a history of allergic disease.1 Given that genetic factors, including family history, are predictors of allergic diseases in offspring, we expect the birth of many infants with a high risk of developing allergies. Among allergy prevention strategies, the effectiveness of primary prevention of eczema in high-risk infants by the topical application of emollient during the neonatal period has been demonstrated in 2 randomized controlled trials (RCTs).
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Letters Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 18 November 2019Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In PracticeAuthor(s): Puja Sood Rajani, Hayley Martin, Marion Groetch, Kirsi M. JärvinenAbstractBreastfeeding is currently recommended as the optimal source of nutrition to infants. However, there are several studies that have shown clinical IgE and non-IgE-mediated reactions to foods in exclusively breastfeeding infants, specifically to cow’s milk, egg, peanut, and fish. Literature suggests that antigenic food proteins present in human milk can be found in substantial enough amounts to elicit clinical reac...
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Scratching the skin triggers a series of immune responses culminating in an increased number of activated mast cells -- immune cells involved in allergic reactions -- in the small intestine, according to research conducted in mice. This newly identified skin-gut communication helps illuminate the relationship between food allergy and atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema), a disease characterized by dry, itchy skin. The NIAID-supported study was led by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
ConclusionModerate-to-severe AD is associated with significant decrements of health utility in the US population. These data illustrate the heavy societal burden of moderate and severe AD and provide important insight for prioritization of resource allocation and cost-effectiveness research.
Source: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Evidence suggests that, compared with no probiotic, currently available probiotic strains probably make little or no difference in improving patient-rated eczema symptoms. Probiotics may make little or no difference in QoL for people with eczema nor in investigator-rated eczema severity score (combined with participant scoring for eczema symptoms of itch and sleep loss); for the latter, the observed effect was small and of uncertain clinical significance. Therefore, use of probiotics for the treatment of eczema is currently not evidence-based. This update found no evidence of increased adverse effects with pro...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
More News: Allergy | Allergy & Immunology | Antiviral Therapy | Corticosteroid Therapy | Dermatitis | Dermatology | Eczema | Food Allergy | Pediatrics | Skin | Turkey Health