The FDA Revokes Emergency Use Authorization for Hydroxychloroquine, Citing New Evidence

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that it is revoking the emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, citing a lack of evidence that these drugs are effective for COVID-19. Early on in the pandemic, doctors scrambling to find a way to treat the disease widely prescribed hydroxychloroquine to their sickest patients, based on thin evidence from a handful of relatively weak studies. However, recent research has made it increasingly clear that the drug is likely ineffective against the disease, and that it carries a risk of significant side effects, including heart problems. The chief scientist for the FDA, Denise M. Hinton, announced the decision in a letter to the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) on Monday. “Today’s request to revoke is based on new information, including clinical trial data results, that have led BARDA to conclude that this drug may not be effective to treat COVID-19,” she wrote, adding that it is “no longer reasonable” to believe that the drug combination’s benefits outweigh the potential side effects. Hydroxychloroquine is a slightly different version of chloroquine, a drug discovered to fight malaria decades ago. Scientists developed hydroxychloroquine as a replacement for malaria treatment, with fewer side effects; today, in the U.S. it’s mainly prescribed to treat the inflammation related to autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthr...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced today that it is revoking the emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, citing a lack of evidence that these drugs are effective for COVID-19. Early on in the pandemic, doctors scrambling to find a way to treat the disease widely prescribed hydroxychloroquine to their sickest patients, based on thin evidence from a handful of relatively weak studies. However, recent research has made it increasingly clear that the drug is likely ineffective against the disease, and that it carries a risk of significant side effects, including heart problems. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
AbstractHydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an old medication for malaria. In addition to handling this parasitic disease, HCQ is also used to treat a number of autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus when other medications are not effective. Recently a new viral infection (COVID-19) is rocking the entire world so much that it has already taken more than 200,000 lives throughout the world within the last two months and the World Health Organization was forced to declare it as a pandemic on March 11, 2020. Interestingly, some reports indicate that this wonder drug may be also beneficial ...
Source: Journal of NeuroImmune Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) In its May issue, The FASEB Journal is publishing a comprehensive review on the science and clinical experiences with the drugs chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, first introduced as effective weapons against malaria, rheumatoid arthritis, and the autoimmune disease lupus. Recent anecdotal reports suggested these drugs might be effective against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic. This new review describes the growing skepticism regarding adoption of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine for the respiratory infection caused by this virus.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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