Exploring the effects of lifestyle on breast cancer risk, age at diagnosis, and survival: the EBBA-Life study

ConclusionsOur study supports a healthy lifestyle improving breast cancer prevention, postponing onset of disease, and extending life expectancy among breast cancer patients.
Source: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research

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Publication date: Available online 2 July 2020Source: International Journal of Clinical and Health PsychologyAuthor(s): Caterina Calderon, Urbano Lorenzo-Seva, Pere Joan Ferrando, David Gómez-Sánchez, Estrella Ferreira, Laura Ciria-Suarez, Marta Oporto-Alonso, Marina Fernández-Andujar, Paula Jiménez-Fonseca
Source: International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 1 July 2020Source: Pregnancy HypertensionAuthor(s): Haylee Fox, Emily J. Callander
Source: Pregnancy Hypertension: An International Journal of Womens Cardiovascular Health - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: July–August 2020Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology, Volume 27, Issue 5Author(s): Levent Mutlu, Wafa Khadraoui, Tarek Khader, Gulden Menderes
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: July–August 2020Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology, Volume 27, Issue 5Author(s): Víctor Lago, Pilar Bello, Luis Matute, Pablo Padilla-Iserte, Tiermes Marina, Marc Agudelo, Santiago Domingo
Source: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 July 2020Source: Gynecologic Oncology ReportsAuthor(s): Ricardo Pedrini Cruz, Gustavo Peretti Rodini, Margarete Duarte da Rosa, Vinicius Duarte Cabral, Eduardo Cambruzzi, Gabriella Ferrandina, Reitan Ribeiro
Source: Gynecologic Oncology Reports - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Abstract Liver macrophages (LMs) are phagocytic cells that play an important role in many liver disorders due to their ability to respond to a variety of stimuli and activating signals.It is currently debated whether LMs activation from an anti-inflammatory to a proinflammatory phenotype contributes to obesity-induced metabolic diseases. We recently found that LMs can produce noninflammatory factors, such as the protein IGFBP7, able to directly regulate hepatic glucose production and lipid accumulation in the liver. However, while in a mouse model of obesity and insulin resistance LM-Igfbp7 expression is pathologi...
Source: Mol Biol Cell - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: Methods Mol Biol Source Type: research
Conclusions: Bariatric surgery appears to be capable of partially reversing the obesity-related epigenome. The identification of potential epigenetic biomarkers predictive for the success of bariatric surgery may open new doors to personalized therapy for severe obesity. Introduction Obesity is currently a huge healthcare problem, worldwide, and is a risk factor for several diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular disease and cancer (1). As the prevalence of obesity reaches pandemic proportions, this metabolic disease is estimated to become the biggest cause of mortality in the near future (2). In fact,...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
By now, most people have been to a holiday party or two. Lots of food, lots of eggnog and other carb laden alcoholic beverages, and lots of grazing all day long on all the boxes of candy friends and business acquaintances sent to us. It's easy to gain the five pounds most people gain during the holidays, and in the process, raise your blood sugar or glucose levels too high. That's your body letting you know you have prediabetes (higher than normal but still below diabetes levels) or diabetes, and unless you take action soon, your body won't like it. Diabetes silently sneaks up on you and if untreated, slowly weakens your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
October is breast cancer awareness month. Breast cancer is diagnosed in over 220,000 women each year in the US. With one in eight or 12.3 percent of women being diagnosed, what can we do to prevent breast cancer or at the very least reduce our risk? We have all heard the saying, "You are what you eat." If we can control breast cancer through our diet and healthy living, we can focus more on prevention as a viable means to reduce the incidence of this common cancer affecting so many of our family and friends. Diets High in Animal Fat The Nurses' Health Study II showed "premenopausal women who ate diets high ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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