Bigfoot Takes a Big Step Closer to Market with $55M Financing

Bigfoot Biomedical hasn't let the coronavirus pandemic stand in the way of bringing its injection-based digitized insulin dosing platform to the U.S. market. If anything, CEO Jeffrey Brewer says the pandemic has "only crystalized the need for medical solutions like ours that facilitate remote care, remote support, and home delivery." The company has raised a total of $55 million to close its series C equity financing. Abbott led the round with support from existing investors, including Quadrant Capital Advisors, Senvest Capital, Janus Henderson, and Cormorant Asset Management, along with new investors including Smile Group. "Necessity has forced a giant leap forward in telemedicine, and there will be no looking back," Brewer said. "Raising $55 million in equity financing during this time of economic hardship underscores the urgency and focus on getting real-time solutions in the hands of patients, providers, and payers." Bigfoot said the proceeds will support the completion of product development and FDA clearance submission sometime this year for the Bigfoot Unity System, part of the Bigfoot Unity Diabetes Management Program, a real-time, dose-decision support system for people with insulin-requiring diabetes relying on multiple daily injection therapy. Bigfoot Unity uses smart pen caps for basal and meal-time insulin dosing recommendations integrating Abbott's FreeStyle Libre platform. The company plans to package the Bi...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Tags: Business R & D Source Type: news

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I was just curious how your department has been affected by covid ? Business as usual? People being assigned to cover remotely? Clinical shifts being pulled to cover from central ? Etc etc. at my place, so far it is business as usual.
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pharmacy Source Type: forums
Sara Wittner had seemingly gotten her life back under control. After a December relapse in her battle with drug addiction, the 32-year-old completed a 30-day detox program and started taking a monthly injection to block her cravings for opioids. She was engaged to be married, working for a local health advocacy group in Colorado, and counseling others about drug addiction. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The virus knocked down all the supports she had carefully built around her: no more in-person Narcotics Anonymous meetings, no talks over coffee with trusted friends or her addiction recovery sponsor. As the virus stressed...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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