Response to “Another vision from the coronavirus health crisis in Spain: the perspective from 'Plena inclusión' Developmental Disabilities associative movement.” By M. Galvan.

I would like to thank Mr. Galvan for his letter (1). He works for an outstanding organization that we have had the opportunity to collaborate with many times over the years, and even now during this pandemic. However, there are some points in his letter that need clarification regarding my paper in Biological Psychiatry (2). In response to Mr. Galvan ’s comment that the government has not allowed people with intellectual disabilities or autism to go out in the streets, I need only literally translate the government’s mandate: “The activity of using public roads authorized in order to assist and care for the elderly, minors, dependents, peo ple with disabilities, and especially vulnerable people...., allow people with disabilities who have behavioral disturbances, such as people diagnosed with autism spectrum and disruptive behavior disorders, exacerbated by the lockdown under the declaration of the state of emergency, and a companion to use public roads, as long as they comply with the measures necessary to avoid contagion.” (3).
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

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The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news
Abstract Amidst the ongoing novel Coronavirus disease pandemic, children with developmental disabilities warrant specific attention to minimise having disproportionate consequences. These children are especially vulnerable to the effects of the pandemic due to (1) Greater healthcare needs, (2) Dependency on community-based services and (3) Mental health concerns. Healthcare professionals, public health systems and the society needs to come together to advocate for these children by optimising access to healthcare and community intervention services, promoting mental well-being and caregiver welfare. The consequenc...
Source: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: J Autism Dev Disord Source Type: research
Missing social contacts and altered routines, disturbed sleep and eating habits can be particularly intense for the kids with developmental challenges.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Special Education Children and Childhood Education (K-12) Parenting Intellectual Disabilities Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Quarantines Autism Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Source Type: news
I would like to thank Mr. Galv án for his letter (1). He works for an outstanding organization that we have had the opportunity to collaborate with many times over the years, and even now during this pandemic. However, there are some points in his letter that need clarification in response to my correspondence in Biological Psyc hiatry (2). In response to Mr. Galván’s comment that the government has not allowed people with intellectual disabilities or autism to go out in the streets, I need only literally translate the government’s mandate: “The activity of using public roads authorized in o...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
In conclusion, none of us planned for this terrible virus to circle the globe. And none of us could anticipate how dangerous maintaining close social contact could become. We, like most, are simply making the best of a horrific situation. COVID-19 is bad, but it’s much worse if you’re autistic. You are simply one step more removed from people, and this, although significantly detrimental, can be compensated for with a little love and creativity.
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Aspergers Autism Children and Teens Parenting Personal Autism Spectrum Autistic Children coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Source Type: blogs
This guidance has been assessed to identify potential equality impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with mental health problems or a learning disability and/or autism. It is acknowledged that people with mental health needs, a learning disability or autism who contract COVID-19 may require reasonable adjustments, and that the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to affect mental health and wellbeing.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The COVID-19 pandemic has been described as “the war of our generation.” Millions of families are bravely waging war on COVID-19 by rising to the many challenges of social distancing, including upended school and work routines, financial insecurity, and inability to see loved ones, all compounded by the uncertainty of how long this will last. These challenges are likely magnified for those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Features of ASD, including impaired social and communication skills, repetitive behaviors, and insistence on sameness, can make it very difficult to understand social distancing, express d...
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