Was Covid-19 lockdown the right thing to do?

What do Sciencebase readers make of the view that there will far more long-term excess deaths and misery caused by the global lockdowns than there would have been had we let this coronavirus run free? This question is about estimating the serious long-term effects rather than giving those covidiots who fancy a trip to the beach or Barnard Castle an excuse to run wild and party. It is being discussed widely by many lockdown skeptics, including very well-respected scientists such as Mark Changizi. Obviously allowing the virus to run free would have meant overwhelming our healthcare services and there’d have been many more acute tragedies around the world. But, in the long-term the economic and social damage will ultimately lead to greater levels of suffering on a much wider scale. Ultimately, there will be many more excess deaths some argue*. This will be partly due to delayed diagnosis and treatments that will be available to everyone “after” Covid-19. It will also be partly due to mental health problems that emerge leading to an increased suicide rate caused by the loss of employment, companies collapsing, and the general negative effects of the “new normal”. *News in today suggests that the death rate in France is the lowest it’s been for several years even when compared to a bad flu year. Personally, I believe lockdown is the right thing to do for the sake of the more vulnerable and to avoid that overwhelming of the healthcare systems. We...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

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The novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted significantly on many sectors globally, and has also impacted mental health of many individuals (Ahorsu et al., 2020; Tandon, 2020) and in greater numbers than those who are actually infected w...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Sara Wittner had seemingly gotten her life back under control. After a December relapse in her battle with drug addiction, the 32-year-old completed a 30-day detox program and started taking a monthly injection to block her cravings for opioids. She was engaged to be married, working for a local health advocacy group in Colorado, and counseling others about drug addiction. Then the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The virus knocked down all the supports she had carefully built around her: no more in-person Narcotics Anonymous meetings, no talks over coffee with trusted friends or her addiction recovery sponsor. As the virus stressed...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Wei-Hsin Lu Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted many aspects of people’s lives all over the world. This Facebook survey study aimed to investigate the COVID-19-related factors that were associated with sleep disturbance and suicidal thoughts among members of the public during the COVID-19 pandemic in Taiwan. The online survey recruited 1970 participants through a Facebook advertisement. Their self-reported experience of sleep disturbance and suicidal thoughts in the previous week were collected along with a number of COVID-19-related factors, including level of worry, change in social ...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Conclusion. During the epidemic period, in addition to strengthening the protection work, we should also monitor the mental and psychological state of the population to prevent mental illness caused by coronavirus. PMID: 32550035 [PubMed]
Source: Case Reports in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Case Rep Psychiatry Source Type: research
The last decade saw an increase in national attention to suicide as the second leading cause of death among adolescents [1] and for increased youth suicide prevention efforts. Adolescents at highest risk are typically referred to emergency departments for ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Ameta-analysis of 14 studies found that brief suicide prevention interventions for patients at risk of suicide are associated with reduced subsequent suicide attempts and increased linkage to follow-up care, but not with reduced depression symptoms. The findings were published yesterday inJAMA Psychiatry.“All of these studies show that we have evidence-based treatments in our arsenal to fight the suicide epidemic that work in different settings and different populations,” wrote Nadline M. Melhem, Ph.D., and David Brent, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an accompanyingeditorial. &ldquo...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: brief suicide interventions David Brent depression JAMA Psychiatry linkage to care meta-analysis Nadline Melhem pandemic Stephanie Doupnik suicide prevention Source Type: research
Abstract Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged in December 2019 from Wuhan, China. It typically presents with mild upper respiratory tract infection symptoms and may have life threatening complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute stroke, myocardial infarction, kidney failure, shock, and even death. Coronavirus infections are known to have neuroinvasive potential with consequent neuropsychiatric manifestations. We analyzed COVID-19 adult patients in the TriNetX database, which is a global health collaborative clinical research platform collecting real-time electronic medical records...
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Brain Behav Immun Source Type: research
In March 2020, as the coronavirus pandemic spread throughout the United States, Americans bought nearly 2 million guns -- the second highest monthly total in the decades since such records have been kept. Previous spikes in U.S. firearm sales have followed...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news
The last decade saw an increase in national attention to suicide as the second leading cause of death among adolescents [1] and for increased youth suicide prevention efforts. Adolescents at highest risk are typically referred to emergency departments for assessment and immediate safety management, and those who cannot be maintained safely at home are often hospitalized on inpatient psychiatric units until risk decreases. At the outpatient level, mental health interventions include individual and group psychotherapy, family and collateral sessions, and medication management.
Source: Journal of Adolescent Health - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
I am familiar with agoraphobia, not just as a mental health crisis responder but because my own mental illness has manifested into periods of debilitating anxiety. What I now refer to as the breakdown of 2007, was a period of my life where I was struggling with many issues and my mental health suffered greatly as a result. I found it difficult to leave my house and the comfort zone of my home. Staying home as much as possible was the only way I could maintain some sense of sanity, when I was feeling anything but sane. I lived in this state of chronic agoraphobia for many days. This turned into many months and eventually it...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety and Panic Agoraphobia coronavirus COVID-19 social distancing Source Type: blogs
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