The status and trends of coronavirus research: A global bibliometric and visualized analysis

Conclusions: The outbreak of the epidemic could promote coronavirus research, meanwhile, coronavirus research contributes to overcoming the epidemic. Attention should be drawn to the latest popular research, including “Spike protein,” “Receptor binding domain,” and “Vaccine.” Therefore, more and more efforts will be put into mechanism research and vaccine research and development, which can be helpful to deal with the epidemic.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Source Type: research

Related Links:

AbstractSince December 2019, the world is affected by an outbreak of a new disease named COVID-19, which is an acronym of ‘coronavirus disease 2019’. Coronaviruses (CoV) were assumed to be associated with mild upper respiratory tract infections, such as common cold. This perception changed in time due to occurrence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS-CoV in 2002 and the Middle East Respir atory Syndrome (MERS) caused by MERS-CoV in 2012, both inducing an epidemic severe viral pneumonia with potentially respiratory failure and numerous extra-pulmonary manifestations. The novel coronavi...
Source: Acta Neurologica Belgica - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
I live-tweeted a fascinating and perhaps rather depressing meeting with William Haseltine via a Reuters Newsmaker Broadcast. His talk was upbeat but the message does not offer a positive outlook unless we can collaborate internationally to identify, trace, and isolate and go back to early antivirals to treat people urgently. A vaccine will probably never be found, we must stay on top of this virus when we get communities under control. Moreover, we must recognise that another emergent pathogen could appear any time. These are essentially my notes from Haseltines’s talk. Might we ever achieve herd immunity? There is n...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the original article. The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Ignacio López-Goñi is microbiologist and works in University of Navarra (Spain). The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
Abstract On January 31, 2020, novel coronavirus (nCoV), a zoonotic virus yet to be identified into the taxonomy, created a powerful ripple through mankind that the World Health Organization has declared a global health emergency.1 This is definitely not the first time that an alarm has been rung by this family of viruses. Epidemic impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) due to SARS CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) by MERS CoV has engraved their place in the scientific literature.2 In general, CoV is known to cause respiratory diseases in humans and accounts for one-third of common cold in...
Source: J Contemp Dent Pract - Category: Dentistry Authors: Tags: J Contemp Dent Pract Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2020Source: Microbes and InfectionAuthor(s): Jieliang ChenAbstractA zoonotic coronavirus, labeled as 2019-nCoV by The World Health Organization (WHO), has been identified as the causative agent of the viral pneumonia outbreak in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019. Although 2019-nCoV can cause a severe respiratory illness like SARS and MERS, evidence from clinics suggested that 2019-nCoV is generally less pathogenic than SARS-CoV, and much less than MERS-CoV. The transmissibility of 2019-nCoV is still debated and needs to be further assessed. To avoid the 2019-nCoV outbreak turnin...
Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
The year of the rat is off to an ominous start. “We just stay home and don’t go out,” says Mr. Dong. The 33-year-old researcher, who provided only one name, has no other options. He, his wife and their 3-month-old daughter live in Wuhan, the epicenter of an unfolding global health crisis. They’re treating the forced time at home as a holiday, though he says, “this is different than any of them before.” Families like his huddle in their homes, fearful that if they venture out, they will get sick. Since the first cases of a previously unknown pneumonia-like illness emerged in December, Wuh...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
When Justin Steece ventures out of his apartment in Wuhan, his primary worry isn’t getting sick. He’s more concerned that he might bring the deadly pneumonia-like virus circulating the city back home to his wife and newborn baby. But with supplies of infant formula getting low, Steece doesn’t have much of a choice. “He’s a very chill kid and doesn’t cry much unless he’s hungry,” Steece, 26, from Lake George, Minn., who works as a teacher in Wuhan, tells TIME. “My biggest fear is that I’ll go out and accidentally transmit the disease to my family.” At 3 a.m. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news
Chinese officials confirmed Wednesday that the number of people infected by a new form of coronavirus in the country has reached more than 6,000, a total that surpasses the official cases tallied on the mainland during an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2002 and 2003. SARS infected 5,237 people in mainland China, and killed almost 800 people across the world. The new SARS-like form of coronavirus has killed 133 people in China and more than 3,500 cases have been confirmed in Hubei, the province where Wuhan is located, according to a virus tracker maintained by researchers at Johns Hopkins University...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV China Infectious Disease onetime overnight Source Type: news
More News: China Health | Coronavirus | COVID-19 | Databases & Libraries | Epidemics | Epidemiology | Hong Kong Health | Internal Medicine | MERS | Netherlands Health | Outbreaks | Pneomococcal Vaccine | Pneumonia | SARS | Science | Study | USA Health | Vaccines | Virology