Frontline Health Workers Abroad Help Protect Us —Let’s Support Them

By Carol Bales , Advocacy and policy communications manager, IntraHealth International ; Casey Bishopp, Communications officer, IntraHealth InternationalMay 22, 2020Here in North Carolina, we all know someone who works in health care. Maybe there’s a nurse in your family, a physician, a data clerk, a pharmacist.These“frontline health workers” are in the spotlight right now as they face unprecedented dangers during every shift they work.Frontline health workers are literally putting themselves on the line—at great personal risk—to respond to COVID-19, stop its spread, and save their patients lives. AtIntraHealth International, we’ve seen this before. We saw it during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, and then a few years later in theDemocratic Republic of Congo. Now we’re all seeing it in our back yards.That’s because pandemics like COVID-19 don’t respect political boundaries—they never have, and they never will.At IntraHealth—where we work to improve the performance of health workers and strengthen the systems in which they work—we’ve alsoseen first-hand the power of prepared, supported, and connected teams of frontline health workers in containing and responding to infectious disease outbreaks.Having enough well-trained, well-placed, and well-protected health workers won’t make diseases go away, but it can prevent them from becoming pandemics in the first place.The world is facing a shor...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases COVID-19 Advocacy Health Workers Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary fibrosis may develop early in patients with COVID-19 after hospital discharge. Older patients with severe illness during treatment were more prone to develop fibrosis according to thin-section CT results. PMID: 32474479 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of X-Ray Science and Technology - Category: Radiology Tags: J Xray Sci Technol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The Geographic Information System (GIS) associated with spatio-temporal scan statistics can provide timely support for surveillance and assist in decision-making.
Source: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract The novel coronavirus pneumonia (NCP) outbreak occurred in Wuhan, China at the end of 2019. Here, we report the clinical characteristics and therapeutic procedure for a case of severe NCP. The patient was started on glucocorticoids and non-invasive ventilator treatment. After treatment, the patient ’ s symptoms improved, and the status was confirmed as NCP negative. Our results may provide clues for the treatment of NCP.
Source: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
Abstract The full spectrum of COVID-19 is still emerging, although several studies have highlighted that patients infected with the novel coronavirus can potentially develop a hypercoagulable state. However, several aspects related to the incidence and pathophysiology of the association between COVID-19 and pulmonary embolism are not well established. Here, we present a case of a patient with COVID-19 who developed acute pulmonary embolism. Clinical and laboratory data and findings of non-enhanced CT indicate possibility of acute pulmonary embolism, and support the decision to proceed with computed tomography pulmonary ang...
Source: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical - Category: Tropical Medicine Source Type: research
By Katherine Seaton, Editorial OfficerMay 04, 2020Data systems are crucial for health care all the time, but during a natural disaster, war, or pandemic like COVID-19, functioning data systems can mean the difference between life and death.Data help us know what the health needs are, what capabilities each nearby hospital and clinic has, and where health workers should be deployed. Essential for responding to a pandemic, these data help monitor the spread and intensity of disease and help everyone, not just health workers, understand its severity and impact on society.If the systems are operating smoothly, we don’t...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Digital Health Health Workforce & Systems Source Type: news
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
This playground just outside the Slovak capital, Bratislava, has been sealed off to stop people spreading the virus. Similar measures are in place in cities and towns across Europe, which is now the epicentre of the virus's spread. Credit: Ed Holt/IPSBy Ed HoltBRASTISLAVA , Mar 16 2020 (IPS) Governments in wealthy, first world countries must not ignore the plight of poorer nations battling the coronavirus or the disease will not be brought under control, global development experts have said. As African nations slowly report growing numbers of cases, and more and more infections are registered in countries with endemic pove...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Aid Development & Aid Editors' Choice Europe Featured Global Global Governance Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations Cor Source Type: news
This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the original article. The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Ignacio López-Goñi is microbiologist and works in University of Navarra (Spain). The post Coronavirus: Ten Reasons Why You Ought Not to Panic appeared first on Inter Press Service.
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Global Headlines Health Coronavirus Source Type: news
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news
As 10-year-old Connor and a friend played one recent day at recess, they were approached by a group of boys wanting to play a game — testing the boys for coronavirus. Connor, who is half-Chinese, and his friend, also Chinese, played along at first, but Connor’s mother Nadia Alam tells TIME that they quickly became uncomfortable and that the other boys wouldn’t stop, she says. “In this instance, I honestly don’t think the kids who targeted my son acted out of malice,” Alam said in an emailed statement to TIME. “They were acting out the fear and ignorance around them. My son was upse...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV onetime Source Type: news
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