Can My Family Visit This Weekend? Dr. Mallika Marshall Answers Your Coronavirus Questions

BOSTON (CBS) —  As Massachusetts continues to fight the coronavirus pandemic, the public has plenty of questions. Dr. Mallika Marshall answered some of those sent to her email (drmallika@cbs.com) and Facebook and Twitter accounts. “Is it true that if someone tested positive for COVID-19 that they will always test positive because they have the antibody in them?” –Lina There are two main tests right now. One is a swab in the nose that looks for the actual virus in the body. The other is a blood test that looks for antibodies to the virus. Once the virus is gone from the body, the nasal swab test should turn negative. But if you have been infected or exposed to the coronavirus, the blood test will continue to show antibodies to the virus for some time. We’re just not sure for how long they stick around. “I am over 75 and have Lupus. My family would like to come to visit for Memorial Day weekend. Is it too soon or okay?” -Ann I hate to say it, but I think it’s still too soon. I was also supposed to visit my mom who is in her 70s this holiday weekend but it’s not worth the risk. If your family comes and stays outside of the house, wears masks, and visits from a distance, that’s one thing. But given you’re in a high-risk group, you should continue to keep your distance from anyone who does not live with you, even if they, too, have been in quarantine. “I am 80 with multiple pre-existin...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Coronavirus Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

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Publication date: May 2020Source: Membrane Technology, Volume 2020, Issue 5Author(s):
Source: Membrane Technology - Category: Materials Science Source Type: research
Conclusions: The present data suggest that CT and TT genotypes of OPN 707 C/T SNP are associated with a higher SLE risk, but do not affect the clinical course of the disease in the Polish population. PMID: 32489353 [PubMed]
Source: Advances in Dermatology and Allergology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Postepy Dermatol Alergol Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 3 June 2020Source: Clinica Chimica ActaAuthor(s): Agostino Ognibene, Maria Lorubbio, Pasqualino Magliocca, Emanuela Tripodo, Guendalina Vaggelli, Giovanni Iannelli, Marco Feri, Raffaele Scala, Alessandro Polcini Tartaglia, Angelo Galano, Alessandro Pancrazzi, Danilo Tacconi
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
The healing power of ultraviolet light (UV) has flown under the radar for decades. Yet, it’s one of the most powerful detoxifying agents known to man. It kills bacteria and viruses and can be used in a clinical setting. The therapeutic benefits of light have been known for millennia. Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, believed light was essential to balance the body and emotions. And there is good reason why, during the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, medics discovered that severely ill patients had hugely better recovery rates when they were nursed outside and had regular exposure to sunlight.1 You see, UV r...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: news
The drug – now a partisan wedge issue – has fueled hype and hope, but evidence of its effectiveness remains limitedCoronavirus – live US updatesLive global updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWith endorsements from a controversial French physician, Fox News and Donald Trump,hydroxychloroquine– an old anti-malarial drug that is today more commonly used to treat lupus – has received a disproportionate amount of attention as a potential treatment for Covid-19.It has also become another partisan political wedge issue in the US:conservative politicians and media figures have hyped studies that s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Coronavirus outbreak US news World news Infectious diseases Medical research Science Health Source Type: news
BOSTON (CBS) – As the number of coronavirus cases continues to grow, we are receiving a number of questions from the public. Dr. Mallika Marshall answered some of the questions sent to WBZ-TV’s Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts. I see so many wearing masks but continually touching the mask and their face. Is this causing more harm than good? – Joseph One of the benefits of wearing a mask, if you wear it properly, is that you’re less likely to touch your hands to your nose or mouth. People touch their face up to 23 times an hour and having a face mask is a reminder not to do that. But masks a...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Coronavirus Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news
By SIMON YU, MD, LT COL, USA (Ret) Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), opened up a new front in the Coronavirus War by saying we don’t just need to treat the acute disease, we need to treat the underlying conditions that make people more susceptible to serious disease progression. He focused on heart disease, and managing mitigating risk factors such as CVD, diabetes, hypertension and smoking in order to increase people’s odds for recovery. The initial focus has been pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), with risk factors including ast...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 CDC chronic disease holistic care Pandemic SDoH Source Type: blogs
In early April, about four months after a new, highly infectious coronavirus was first identified in China, an international group of scientists reported encouraging results from a study of an experimental drug for treating the viral disease known as COVID-19. It was a small study, reported in the New England Journal of Medicine, but showed that remdesivir, an unapproved drug that was originally developed to fight Ebola, helped 68% of patients with severe breathing problems due to COVID-19 to improve; 60% of those who relied on a ventilator to breathe and took the drug were able to wean themselves off the machines after 18...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
AbstractThe ongoing pandemic coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a matter of global concern. Environmental factors such as  air pollution and smoking and comorbid conditions (hypertension, diabetes mellitus and underlying cardio-respiratory illness) likely increase the severity of COVID-19. Rheumatic manifestations such as arthralgias and arthritis may be prevalent in about a seventh of individuals. COVID-19 can resul t in acute interstitial pneumonia, myocarditis, leucopenia (with lymphopenia) and thrombocytopenia, also seen in rheumatic...
Source: Clinical Rheumatology - Category: Rheumatology Source Type: research
After President Trump, late last week, expressed great confidence in the promise of a new COVID-19 therapy that combines two existing prescription medications, supplies of these two drugs rapidly began disappearing from pharmacy shelves. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed an Indian company previously restricted from importing drug products into the US to now start manufacturing one of the drugs. And U.S. plants began gearing up to produce enough to meet the surge in demand. But in those few days, a few people who began self medicating with the drugs in an effort to prevent COVID-19 have died, and others have bee...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
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