Testing Won ’ t Get Us Where We Need to Go

Conclusions Testing is important to track the trajectory of an epidemic in a community to guide local or national efforts at mitigationThe tests we currently have for COVID have limited accuracy for the individual patientAntibody testing suggests that the fatality rate for COVID may be low in certain communities, but data from New York suggests there is the potential for significant death and morbidity in any major metropolitan areaContact tracing enabled by smart phone technology is likely unable to be effective because they do not overcome the inherent limitations of COVID testing, require widespread adoption, and may not even be accurate at determining high risk contacts. Mass testing alone is unlikely to completely explain the varying death rates seen by countryTesting is no panacea. This suggests a comprehensive strategy that incorporates testing, but doesn’t rely on it. Anish Koka is a Cardiologist in practice in Philadelphia. He is co-host of the podcast, The Accad &Koka Report, and can be followed on Twitter @anish_koka.  An edited version of this piece appeared in Medscape.
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Anish Koka COVID-19 testing Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: September 2020Source: American Heart Journal, Volume 227Author(s): Payam Dehghani, Laura J. Davidson, Cindy L. Grines, Keshav Nayak, Jacqueline Saw, Prashant Kaul, Akshay Bagai, Ross Garberich, Christian Schmidt, Hung Q. Ly, Jay Giri, Perwaiz Meraj, Binita Shah, Santiago Garcia, Scott Sharkey, David A. Wood, Frederick G. Welt, Ehtisham Mahmud, Timothy D. Henry
Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. The correct information is given below.
Source: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. Complete figure captions are missing.
Source: Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Authors: Robb CM, Kour S, Contreras JI, Agarwal E, Barger CJ, Rana S, Sonawane Y, Neilsen BK, Taylor M, Kizhake S, Thakare RN, Chowdhury S, Wang J, Black JD, Hollingsworth MA, Brattain MG, Natarajan A Abstract [This corrects the article DOI: 10.18632/oncotarget.23749.]. PMID: 32637035 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Authors: Sarfstein R, Werner H Abstract A significant volume of clinical and epidemiological data provides support to the concept that insulin and the insulin receptor (INSR) have an important role in breast cancer. Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated molecule in human cancer. The present study was aimed at evaluating the hypothesis that p53 governs the expression and activation of the INSR gene in breast cancer cells. In addition, the study was designed to investigate the mechanism of action of p53 in the context of INSR gene regulation. The availability of MCF7 breast cancer-derived cell lines wit...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: New-onset AF and the other severe complications were not associated with poorer long-term survival following esophagectomy. In addition, administration of landiolol hydrochloride after esophagectomy did not contribute to prolonging the OS. PMID: 32637032 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirmed a high frequency of KIT and NRAS mutations in SUM, as well as a low incidence of BRAF mutations. We reported novel KRAS, CTNNB1, TP53, ERBB2, and SMAD4 mutations in SUM. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of SUM. PMID: 32637031 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Authors: Chae HD, Dutta R, Tiu B, Hoff FW, Accordi B, Serafin V, Youn M, Huang M, Sumarsono N, Davis KL, Lacayo NJ, Pigazzi M, Horton TM, Kornblau SM, Sakamoto KM Abstract The 90 kDa Ribosomal S6 Kinase (RSK) drives cell proliferation and survival in cancers, although its oncogenic mechanism has not been well characterized. Phosphorylated level of RSK (T573) was increased in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and associated with poor survival. To examine the role of RSK in AML, we analyzed apoptosis and the cell cycle profile following treatment with BI-D1870, a potent inhibitor of RSK. BI-D1870 treatment increa...
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Source: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
Source: Canadian Journal of Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
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