Treatment Options for Fear of Blushing

AbstractPurpose of ReviewTo review mechanisms of blushing and fear of blushing from physiological, neuropharmacological and psychological viewpoints, and to evaluate current forms of treatment for blushing-related fear.Recent FindingsBlushing appears to be driven primarily by sympathetic adrenomedullary and neural vasodilator discharge, possibly in association with secondary neurovascular inflammation. Psychological risk factors for fear of blushing include social anxiety, coupled with heightened self-focused attention and inflated beliefs about the likelihood and social costs of blushing. In addition, schemas of emotional inhibition, social isolation and alienation may underlie blushing-related fears. Established psychological treatments for fear of blushing include task concentration training, exposure, cognitive therapy, social skills training, psychoeducation and applied relaxation. More novel approaches include mindfulness and mindful self-compassion, video feedback and imagery rescripting. There are no established pharmacological treatments specifically for fear of blushing. However, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are effective treatments for social anxiety disorder and may thus help some patients manage their fear of blushing.SummaryA reactive sympathetic nervous system may interact with psychological predispositions to intensify fear of blushing. These physiological and psychological risk factors could be promi...
Source: Current Psychiatry Reports - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

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Conclusions: Results suggest that the presentation of externalizing problem behavior and internalizing symptoms associated with GI problems differs between young children and older children with ASD. Therefore, behavior may have different relationships with GI symptoms at different ages, which may have implications for the treatment of and clinical approach to GI disturbances in ASD. Introduction Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts, as well as restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, and acti...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
In conclusion, the studies presented in the current review demonstrate that CBD has the potential to limit delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairment and improve cognitive function in various pathological conditions. Human studies suggest that CBD may have a protective role in delta-9-THC-induced cognitive impairments; however, there is limited human evidence for CBD treatment effects in pathological states (e.g. schizophrenia). In short, they found that CBD may help alleviate the negative impact of a person with schizophrenia from taking cannabis, both in the psychotic and cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia. T...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Disorders General Research Treatment cannabidiol Cannabis cbd cbd oil Marijuana THC Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: Results highlight the need to account for important moderators like the valence of social interaction when looking at the physiological consequences of maladaptive emotion regulation strategies. PMID: 30667270 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety Stress Coping Source Type: research
Scary movies, haunted houses and other spooky activities send some people running, while others can’t get enough. But what’s actually going on in the brains of fear-loving folks? Less than you might think, according to a study recently published in the journal Emotion. After having a voluntary scary experience, the researchers found, people were in better moods and had decreased brain activity overall. “We think it’s very similar, at least at a physiological and neurological level, to the runner’s high experience, where you’re really pushing yourself and your sympathetic nervous system i...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized halloween 2018 healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news
SAD1 is a common and debilitating psychiatric disorder characterized by extreme fear and avoidance of one or more social situations (APA,  2013). Some studies have shown that patients with SAD show enhanced physiological reactions to socially threatening situations, such as increased heart rate (Garcia-Rubio et al., 2017; Gramer et al., 2012; Gramer and Sprintschnik, 2008), decreased HRV (Garcia-Rubio et al., 2017; Gerlach et al. , 2003; Grossman et al., 2001), reflecting increased sympathetic nervous system activity and decreased parasympathetic nervous system activity.
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research paper Source Type: research
Facial blushing, a sudden redness of the face triggered by emotional or social stress, is regarded as the hallmark of embarrassment and is often present in social anxiety disorders. It was defined in 1872 by Charles Darwin1 as the most peculiar of all human expressions of emotions and strictly related to what other people think of us. Although in most circumstances it constitutes an adequate social signal, it may sometimes become an invalidating condition that can significantly impair social interaction and quality of life.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial commentary Source Type: research
View Original Article Here: Erasing the Stigma of Geriatric Anxiety and Learning to Help The effects of anxiety disorders are becoming ever more prevalent in our society. Even with new research shining a light on how many Americans suffer from these varying disorders, we have only begun to scratch the surface. This is especially true when it comes to understanding anxiety in the elderly. Higher rates of loss, increased pain, chronic conditions, and multiple medications can all increase the levels of anxiety in senior citizens. This makes having the discussion about geriatric anxiety a crucial factor in aiding our loved on...
Source: Shield My Senior - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Senior Safety Source Type: blogs
Abstract Because chronic stress is an important risk factor for anxiety states and depressive disorders, we studied hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathetic system activity via changes in cortisol and alpha amylase activity levels in pediatric generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients (n = 26) with comorbid depression and a healthy comparison group (n = 26). Morning plasma cortisol and diurnal profiles of salivary cortisol and salivary alpha amylase (sAA) activity were assessed, also reactivity of HPA‐axis, sAA activity, and heart rate following a psychosocial stressor (...
Source: Stress and Health - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: RESEARCH ARTICLE Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 November 2016 Source:Journal of Anxiety Disorders Author(s): Michelle Rozenman, Allison Vreeland, John Piacentini Cognitive bias and physiological arousal are two putative markers that may underlie youth anxiety. However, data on relationships between cognitive bias and arousal are limited, and typically do not include behavioral measurement of these constructs in order to tap real-time processes. We aimed to examine the relationship between performance-based cognitive bias and sympathetic arousal during stress in clinically anxious and typically-developing youth. The sample included ...
Source: Journal of Anxiety Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Anxiety and Depression Symptom Dimensions Demonstrate Unique Relationships with the Startle Reflex in Anticipation of Unpredictable Threat in 8 to 14 Year-Old Girls. J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2016 May 26; Authors: Nelson BD, Hajcak G Abstract There is growing evidence that heightened sensitivity to unpredictability is a core mechanism of anxiety disorders. In adults, multiple anxiety disorders have been associated with a heightened startle reflex in anticipation of unpredictable threat. Child and adolescent anxiety has been linked to an increased startle reflex across baseline, safety, and threat c...
Source: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: J Abnorm Child Psychol Source Type: research
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