Study: Asbestos Is Primary Contributing Cause of Mesothelioma

Mesothelioma incidence has steadily increased in the United States since the first case was reported in 1947. Every year approximately 2,000 to 3,000 cases are reported in the United States. Primarily linked to asbestos exposure, mesothelioma cases typically take 20 to 50 years to develop. "Mesothelioma Epidemiology, Carcinogenesis and Pathogenesis" is a 2008 study where researchers tracked the causes and history of mesothelioma. The study found that asbestos was the main contributing cause in the development of mesothelioma. Three mineral fibers in general were found to be primary causes of mesothelioma, chrysotile, amphibole and erionite. Amphibole represents the five different types of curly fibers that are recognized by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as asbestos. Of the three, erionite was found to be the most potent mineral fiber for inducing pleural mesothelioma in tests on rats. One main reason why study researchers believe asbestos is a primary cause of mesothelioma is the deadly biological processes it produces within mesothelial cells. Asbestos fibers have been linked to the induction of a cytokine that does not promote mesothelial cell survival. The lack of this antigen in cells causes the DNA of mesothelial cells to mutate and develop into cancerous cells. According to the study, mesothelioma cases are expected to peak in the United States and around the world in the next 20 years. Researchers contributed that genetic predisposition has a sign...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

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In conclusion, the additional analyses we performed according to Mezei et al’s suggestions confirm the association between asbestos exposure and pericardial and TVT mesothelioma, supporting the c ausal role of asbestos for all mesotheliomas. ReNaM`s continuing surveillance system with national coverage is a precious platform for launching analytical studies on pleural and extra pleural mesothelioma. References 1. Mezei G, Chang ET, Mowat FS, Moolgavkar SH. Comments on a recent case-control study of malignant mesothelioma of the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis testis Scand J Work Environ Health – online fi...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Author's reply Source Type: research
Authors: van Zandwijk N, Reid G, Frank AL Abstract Introduction: Asbestos, the most frequent cause of occupational cancer, continues to be consumed on a massive scale, with millions of people exposed on a daily basis. This review explains why we have failed in curtailing the silent epidemic of asbestos-related disease and why the numbers of asbestos victims are likely to remain high. Emerging and developed countries have to be reminded that asbestos exposure has yet to become a problem of the past. The worldwide spread of asbestos, followed by the surge of asbestos-related cancers, resembles the lung cancer epidemi...
Source: Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Expert Rev Anticancer Ther Source Type: research
Abstract In an editorial in an earlier issue of this journal, Johanson &Tinnerberg (1) expressed serious and well-founded concern over the large number of future occupational cancer cases that will result if exposures for a number of substances are not reduced below the so-called "binding occupational exposure limit values" (BOELV) issued by the EU (2). The balance between what is perceived as possible to comply with and the foreseeable health gain when setting BOELV is further discussed in a letter to the Editor by Cherrie (3). This debate raises several important aspects of how to protect workers f...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Authors: Tags: Scand J Work Environ Health Source Type: research
ConclusionHospitalizations data regarding asbestosis and silicosis are consistent. Silicosis had a higher impact than asbestosis on the Italian health system. Although data show decreasing incidence of both fibroses, multiple correspondence analysis highlights that levels of illness severity were higher in silicosis and increased over time in both diseases. Further studies investigating the effectiveness of the current health surveillance programs concerning these diseases are suggested.
Source: The European Journal of Public Health - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
Banning all forms of asbestos won’t end the problem of asbestos-related diseases. It is merely a good starting point. As more countries around the world move closer to an outright ban, Australia has become a reminder to guard against false hope. The Australian experience proves how unrelenting this problem is and how much more work must be done. Fifteen years after its much-celebrated ban of the toxic mineral, Australia has just reached its peak of asbestos-related diseases such as malignant mesothelioma cancer. “It took many years, and efforts from many organizations, for a complete ban to be put in place,&rdq...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
Conclusion: Despite the limited reported study and limited included patient numbers, metabolic PET parameters seems to have a prognostic value in MPM. Results of our study are needed to confirm by prospective larger studies. Research Support: None
Source: Journal of Nuclear Medicine - Category: Nuclear Medicine Authors: Tags: Lung Cancer II Source Type: research
Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and aggressive tumour type arising from the mesothelial surface of the pleural space. MPM is difficult to treat and commonly associated with asbestos exposure, which is its main risk factor [1]. In Europe, the incidence is about 20 per million, with large inter-country variation [2]. As a ban on the use of asbestos was proposed quite recently in most countries, and the median latency between asbestos exposure and MPM onset is about 40 years, incidence rates in some European nations are still rising, with peak incidences expected around 2020 and beyond. Moreover, asbestos ...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Lung cancer Editorials Source Type: research
This article summarises the epidemiology and pathogenesis of malignant pleural mesothelioma, before describing some key factors in the patient experience and outlining common symptoms. Diagnostic approaches are reviewed, including imaging techniques and the role of various biomarkers. Treatment options are summarised, including the importance of palliative care and methods of controlling pleural effusions. The evidence for chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery is reviewed, both in the palliative setting and in the context of trimodality treatment. An algorithm for managing malignant pleural effusion in malignant pleural m...
Source: European Respiratory Review - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Lung cancer Pleural Diseases Source Type: research
The Canadian government spends about $1.7 billion annually on asbestos-related cancers stemming from occupational exposure, according to a recent Institute for Work &Health study. Researchers included the costs of treating mesothelioma and asbestos-related lung cancer, administration expenses, patients’ out-of-pocket costs, caregiving wages, workers’ compensation and employers’ costs to replace absent workers, among other economic burdens. The investigation did not include cancers from secondhand exposure to asbestos and other cancers caused by asbestos exposure. “This [number] is really just th...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: asbestos cancer asbestos in canada asbestos in canada construction asbestos in canada homes asbestos related cancers canadian asbestos epidemic mesothelioma work related asbestos exposure Source Type: news
Conclusion - the need for a global health approach Asbestos and ARD have emerged as global health issues. All countries with a history of asbestos use are experiencing an epidemic of ARD, with the stage of the epidemic being a function of the country’s past asbestos use, whether and when it implemented a ban, and, if no ban is in place, at what levels it continues to use the material. Gaps in human capital and technology available to countries warrant international cooperation. The expansion of national bans in industrializing countries and reducing the burden of ARD in industrialized countries are the short-term targets...
Source: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
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