How to Think About Your Cancer Care in the Time of COVID-19

Getting the news that you have cancer is overwhelming and frightening. The COVID-19 crisis adds another layer of anxiety. But know this: you can protect yourself from COVID-19 without compromising your cancer treatment. Don’t panic. In the vast majority of cases, a diagnosis of cancer is not an emergency even though it feels like one. There is time to learn about your options and sort out what is right for you. For now, there will be changes to how we do things. Some of the changes will feel disruptive, but many will lead to better, more patient-centered care. Minimizing your chances of exposure to the virus doesn’t require sacrificing good care. How you interact with your cancer care team will change during this period. In keeping with directives to shelter in place, whenever possible, your visits will be by phone or video. In-hospital appointments will be kept to a minimum to reduce your potential for exposure. Your treatment/screening schedule may change. Your care team will reschedule or delay treatment when it is safe to do so, without compromising the effectiveness of your treatment. Many oncology societies have issued guidance for care *. Your care team will know best about your particular situation. Your cancer care teams are still at work. If you are newly diagnosed with invasive cancer There are safe ways to postpone surgery. Systemic therapies (chemotherapy, hormone therapy, biologics and immuno-oncology treatments) are already a part of cancer care. S...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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This article is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported Licence.Bjoern C Froehlich, Robert Popp, Constance A Sobsey, Sahar Ibrahim, Andre M LeBlanc, Yassene Mohammed, Marguerite Buchanan, Adriana Aguilar-Mahecha, Oliver Poetz, Michael X Chen, Alan Spatz, Mark Basik, Gerald Batist, Rene Zahedi, Christoph H. Borchers The PI3-kinase/AKT/mTOR pathway plays a central role in cancer signaling. While p110 α is the catalytic α-subunit of PI3-kinase and a major drug target, PTEN is the main negative regulator of... The content of this RSS Feed (c) The Royal Society of Chemistry
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Millions of people stand to lose their Medicaid coverage once special federal pandemic rules for continuous Medicaid enrollment protection come to an end.       
Source: The Commonwealth Fund: Blog - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
The COVID-19 pandemic led to a global increase in hate crimes and xenophobia. In these uncertain times, real or imaginary threats can easily lead to intergroup conflict. Here, we integrate social neuroscience findings with classic social psychology theorie...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news
Adopting a structural violence approach, this article explores, with survivors and practitioners, how early coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic conditions affected forced migrant sexual and gender-based violence survivors' lives. Introducing a new analytical...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news
We aimed to discuss the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the VAW scenario and how it affects women's mental health. The short communication from secondary data collected from the official websites of seven countries in Latin America was performed. The...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news
The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to increases in intimate partner violence (IPV), a leading cause of women's homelessness. Although the Canadian Government provided emergency funding to the violence against women and housing and ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news
[The publisher has not provided an abstract for this article.] Language: en...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: Physical function worsens with older age, particularly for sedentary and socially isolated individuals, and this often leads to injuries. Through reductions in physical activity, the COVID-19 pandemic may have worsened physical function and led...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news
Suicide rates have risen among young people ages 18 –25 in the United States over the past ten years (see Figure 1) [1]. Mental health concerns are on the rise as well, with more teens and young adults experiencing challenges such as anxiety and depres...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
BACKGROUND: In recent times, Nigerian media have carried multiple reports of violent and traumatic social vices. These are well-known trigger factors for fear, worries, and anxiety for corp members and their families. Core member's presentations at the NYS...
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