Meet Violet, the Robot That Can Kill the COVID-19 Virus

In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic has crossed borders and oceans, killing thousands, sickening millions, and forcing millions more to reckon with the economic and personal chaos of closures and lockdowns. Yet as the global infection count rises, the crisis has also given rise to acts of ingenuity. The pandemic has set off a global race for both an effective vaccine and for the accurate, rapid-response tests that will be necessary before workplaces can safely reopen. Vaccines and tests are essential, but they’re not the only front on which to combat the virus. In the face of an urgent threat, scientists have pivoted from other projects and pooled their resources toward breakthroughs aimed at reducing infection and protecting lives. Chief among those are tools that make for cleaner, safer places for patients and those treating them, and that alleviate the crushing demands placed on healthcare workers during this crisis. There’s no magic bullet to halt the advance of COVID-19, but many smaller acts of creativity and collaboration can save lives. The Irish robot Conor McGinn is a roboticist and professor at Trinity College Dublin. McGinn and his colleagues at Trinity’s Robotics and Innovation Lab focus on figuring out how robots can best assist aging individuals in care homes. The signature product from the lab and its spinoff company, Akara Robotics, is Stevie, a 4-foot 7-inch tall social robot whose primary function is alleviating loneliness. In tri...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 July 2020Source: Clinica Chimica ActaAuthor(s): Xingzhong Hu, Dong Chen, Lianpeng Wu, Guiqing He, Wei Ye
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 July 2020Source: Obesity Research &Clinical PracticeAuthor(s): Abdulzahra Hussain, Kamal Mahawar, Zefeng Xia, Wah Yang, Shamsi EL-Hasani
Source: Obesity Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Source Type: research
In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of H2Mab-19 in an LN229 glioblastoma xenograft model. H2Mab-19 showed high binding affinity (KD: 1.1 × 10-8 M) against LN229 cells. Furthermore, H2Mab-19 significantly reduced tumor development in an LN229 xenograft. These results suggest that treatment with H2Mab-19 may be a useful therapy for patients with HER2-expressing glioblastomas. PMID: 32644843 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Monoclonal Antibodies in Immunodiagnosis and Immunotherapy - Category: Microbiology Tags: Monoclon Antib Immunodiagn Immunother Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 July 2020Source: The Annals of Thoracic SurgeryAuthor(s): Andrea Marudi, Giacomo Branchetti, Elisabetta Bertellini
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 July 2020Source: The Annals of Thoracic SurgeryAuthor(s): Gianluca Folesani, Luca Botta, Davide Pacini
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 July 2020Source: Food ControlAuthor(s): Lis Alban, Jesper Valentin Petersen, Anne Kristine Bækbo, Tanja Østergaard Pedersen, Amanda Brinch Kruse, Goncalo Pacheco, Marianne Halberg Larsen
Source: Food Control - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 July 2020Source: Antiviral ResearchAuthor(s): So Young Kim, Weihua Jin, Amika Sood, David W. Montgomery, Oliver C. Grant, Mark M. Fuster, Li Fu, Jonathan S. Dordick, Robert J. Woods, Fuming Zhang, Robert J. Linhardt
Source: Antiviral Therapy - Category: Virology Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Current Opinion in Virology, Volume 44Author(s): Yumiko Komatsu, Keizo Tomonaga
Source: Current Opinion in Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
This report provides basic genetic data on genotype D11 for further study of me asles evolution and the support for measles elimination.
Source: Archives of Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
AbstractFeline morbillivirus (FeMV) is an emerging member of the familyParamyxoviridae that is suspected to be involved in chronic kidney disease (CKD). FeMV was first discovered in Hong Kong in 2012 and has subsequently been detected in many countries. However, the prevalence of FeMV in mainland China is still unclear. To clarify the present status and examine the genetic diversity of FeMV in mainland China, in this study, we collected cat urine samples in veterinary hospitals in Guangdong Province in 2017 and 2018. Using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, we found that the urine of six out of 64 cats tested positive for FeM...
Source: Archives of Virology - Category: Virology Source Type: research
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