Immunotherapy for Neuro-Oncology.

Immunotherapy for Neuro-Oncology. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2020;1244:183-203 Authors: Majd N, Dasgupta P, de Groot J Abstract Immunotherapy has changed the landscape of treatment of many solid and hematological malignancies and is at the forefront of cancer breakthroughs. Several circumstances unique to the central nervous system (CNS) such as limited space for an inflammatory response, difficulties with repeated sampling, corticosteroid use for management of cerebral edema, and immunosuppressive mechanisms within the tumor and brain parenchyma have posed challenges in clinical development of immunotherapy for intracranial tumors. Nonetheless, the success of immunotherapy in brain metastases (BMs) from solid cancers such as melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) proves that the CNS is not an immune-privileged organ and is capable of initiating and regulating immune responses that lead to tumor control. However, the development of immunotherapeutics for the most malignant primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM), has been challenging due to systemic and profound tumor-mediated immunosuppression unique to GBM, intratumoral and intertumoral heterogeneity, low mutation burden, and lack of stably expressed clonal antigens. Here, we review recent advances in the field of immunotherapy for neuro-oncology with a focus on BM and GBM. PMID: 32301015 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research

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Source: Current Cancer Therapy Reviews - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Critical Reviews in Oncology Hematology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
Brain metastases (BM) are the most common intracranial neoplastic disease in adults, with an incidence of 9-17% among all brain tumors (Nayak et al., 2012). They are usually caused by lung cancer (either non-small cell (NSCLC) and small cell (SCLC) histologies), breast cancer, melanoma and renal cell carcinoma, with a raising incidence related to the improvements in diagnostic and treatment approaches (Berghoff et al., 2014). However, prognosis remains poor, with a median overall survival (OS) ranging from 3 to 27 months (Brastianos et al., 2013), rendering BM still an unmet medical need.
Source: Critical Reviews in Oncology Hematology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network : JNCCN - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Natl Compr Canc Netw Source Type: research
AbstractGlioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumour in adults. Current prognosis with standard treatment is poor. Immunotherapy is a new paradigm in tumour management. Specifically, recent advances in the field of immune checkpoint molecules have led to dramatic results in many cancers. Inhibition of one particular, programmed cell death —1 (PD-1) has recently been shown to be highly effective in melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer. There has also been recent data to suggest potential benefit in GBM. There also appears to be a relationship between immune checkpoint inhibition and hypermutation, i...
Source: Journal of Neuro-Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
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